The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Speaking in Tongues

Students at the Korean table displayed figurines and doll clothing depicting traditional Korean dress. The group also showed money, jewelery and pop culture items such as cell phone charms.
Students at the Korean table displayed figurines and doll clothing depicting traditional Korean dress. The group also showed money, jewelery and pop culture items such as cell phone charms.

By Michael Magnus/reporter

International flags and foreign art exhibits lined the walls of Center Corner during Speaking in Tongues: Contemporary Mexican Indigenous Language Writers April 9 on NE Campus. 

Students at the Korean table displayed figurines and doll clothing depicting traditional Korean dress. The group also showed money, jewelery and pop culture items such as cell phone charms.

The presentation by Don Frischmann, Texas Christian University Spanish professor, was part of the annual NE International Festival.

“I want to share a different view of Mexico,” he said. “Mexico, not as a monolithic, monocultural, monolinguistic nation, but rather as something very diverse and different than most people know.”

According to Frischmann’s research, Mexico has 11 language families, 68 linguistic groups and 364 significantly different dialects.

“This gives me the opportunity to talk about what I’ve gone out there and explored and discovered and shared,” he said. “For me as an educator, it is one of the more gratifying experiences one can have.”

Following the discussion of language variations, Frischmann presented a literary lecture featuring Spanish poets reading their own material in their native tongues. Videos of Natalia Toledo, Natalio Hernández and Briceida Cuevas Cob were shared, followed by Frischmann’s English translation.

The German class displayed beer steins and empty German beer bottles and handed out Haribo gummy bears. The Haribo company first introduced the gummy bears in the 1920s in Germany.

“I loved the poets, seeing the poets actually read their works in not only their mother language, but then in Spanish as well,” said Jaime Palmer, NE Spanish instructor.

Frischmann shared his mission of casting positive light on Mexican culture. As a foreigner, he has been able to experience the culture and heritage through different eyes.

“I hope that students take in and are aware of other cultures,” said Modesta Tollison, festival chairwoman. “There is so much diversity not just in the world, but right here on campus.”

See video: Go to http://collegian.tccd.edu

 

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