The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Social media danger lies in obsession, speaker says

By Remy McCool/reporter

Illustration by Alex Bihm/The Collegian
Illustration by Alex Bihm/The Collegian

Social media is a useful tool. However, it does have drawbacks, a NE history instructor said Sept. 23.

Although social media can be an effective means of staying connected, it must be used in moderation, said Andy Hollinger. During The Perils of Social Media, Hollinger informed students about the potential pitfalls of social networking sites, such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

“It is a substitute for actual proximity,” he said.

Hollinger showed a video, Please Stop Using Social Media, Mom, which illustrated to students how social media can potentially consume their lives and keep them from being mentally present in their own day-to-day lives.

“Wherever you are, be there,” he said.

Social networks can preoccupy a person so much they not only are withdrawn from the present moment but also waste a lot of time.

Another point brought to light was the concept that in today’s society there exists a more involved sense of community on social networking sites, such as Facebook, rather than in neighborhoods, clubs or organizations.

“Most of you don’t know your next door neighbors,” he said.

Hollinger said people typically don’t venture much farther than their garage or backyard, so they never really get to know the people who live in the community.

Protection was also a key point Hollinger hit on. For example, if one were to post pictures of the family on vacation, someone would subsequently know that the house was empty and could possibly prompt a break-in.

“Is it really good to give out the details of your schedule?” he asked.

Personal perception, projected perception, promotion, publication and pontificating — Hollinger made it clear that it’s possible to sometimes know too much about somebody and vice versa. For example, knowing a person’s beliefs and opinions may cause people to judge or alter what they think of that person. Also, things a person posts may be easily misunderstood, thereby creating an image that may not be entirely accurate.

Hollinger also reminded students of the permanence of things that people post. Once something is posted online, it will remain there forever. Even if one was to delete it shortly after posting, it is likely that is was captured by someone who saw it.

“Once it’s out there, it’s out there forever,” he said.

Students should have fun with social media, Hollinger said. Nevertheless, they should use it carefully and be informed of the problems it can potentially cause. 

Donate to The Collegian

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tarrant County College. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Collegian