The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

High action, real Navy SEALs leave audience on edge of seats

In the new action-packed film Act of Valor, audiences watch actual Navy SEALs shoot, bomb, chase and rescue in various missions dealing with terrorists. The film is gory but visually stimulating. 
Photo courtesy Relativity Media
In the new action-packed film Act of Valor, audiences watch actual Navy SEALs shoot, bomb, chase and rescue in various missions dealing with terrorists. The film is gory but visually stimulating. Photo courtesy Relativity Media

By Karen Gavis/se news editor

If bombings, bloody torture, rescue missions, bullet-riddled car chases down back roads, manhunts, people being accurately shot dead and miniscule acting are your brand of movie, well, you won’t want to miss this one.

In the new action-packed film Act of Valor, audiences watch actual Navy SEALs shoot, bomb, chase and rescue in various missions dealing with terrorists. The film is gory but visually stimulating.
Photo courtesy Relativity Media

Act of Valor’s cast consists of both actors and actual Navy SEALs. Directed by Mike McCoy and Scott Waugh, much of the movie seems akin to what an embedded reporter might witness on a rescue mission. The squeamish may want to consider that at times. Act of Valor is rated R and obviously not for everyone.

The movie’s one noticeable plot twist comes early on when schoolchildren with ice cream turn into a scene of terrorism. This is quickly followed by a continual barrage of adrenaline-producing action as SEALs rescue a captive female CIA agent. The visual effects leave viewers on the edge of their seats and in need of additional oxygen.

When the action finally dwindles, the audience has time not only to breathe but also to notice how the SEALs, who appeared seamless in action, now appear stiff and unnatural during the dialogue.

Christo, played by Alex Veadov, comes off smooth and fairly believable in his role as a smuggler and terrorist. The audience gets a tiny bit of humor when Christo’s name is not-so-mistakenly mispronounced “Crisco” several times during questioning.

The SEALs who hail from tough places like the Mojave Desert and East L.A., are a force to be reckoned with. When their mission to protect the U.S. from a terrorist threat eventually pits them against a combo force of terrorists and Mexican drug cartel members, the SEALs proceed unhesitatingly and unwaveringly.

Written by Kurt Johnstad, Act of Valor seems somewhat like a documentary. However, a story line was attempted. Its ending, though mostly predictable, did produce a slight surprise with its honoring of another sometimes overlooked but highly esteemed warrior.

Donate to The Collegian

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tarrant County College. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Collegian