The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Sony outduels Microsoft by catering to gamers

Viewpoint by Kenney Kost/editor-in-chief

Sony and Microsoft step into the squared circle this month with the release of the next generation of consoles to the gaming masses. My money is on Sony.

From a business standpoint, Microsoft shot itself in the foot right out of the gate. Announcements about an always-online machine, tough restrictions on selling and playing used games as well as on indie-game developers trying to release games on the Xbox One were a major turnoff.

Microsoft has since reversed its stance on some of these issues, but the intent was already there: the company wants to seize any opportunity to make a buck from its gaming community. This is evident in the remaining business model and the decision to package the Kinect peripheral with the Xbox One bringing the price to $499 versus Sony’s $399 price for the PlayStation 4.

Forcing gamers to buy into the motion-gaming fad is a big no-no in my book, especially since they did nothing to demonstrate any dedication to advancing this area of gaming in the last generation with its failed Kinect project.

From a gaming standpoint, Microsoft secured a better selection of triple-A third-party launch games like Dead Rising 3 and Titanfall. Sony boasts a wealth of first-party exclusives like Killzone: Shadow Fall and Knack. While Microsoft’s launch titles are enticing, Sony has proved to lead in exclusive titles.

Most of my favorite games this generation were Sony exclusives like the Drake’s Fortune series, Heavy Rain, The Last of Us, LittleBigPlanet and ModNation Racer. And, it would not be a surprise to learn a game like Titanfall isn’t under a timed exclusivity agreement, making it available for a Sony pickup at a later date. 

On the indie side, Microsoft has made it easier for these developers to release games on its system, but it may have been too little too late. Microsoft’s camp has had few announcements on indie releases while Sony showed off 33 playable titles at this year’s Electronic Entertainment Expo and announced 12 more titles coming to PlayStation 4 at this year’s Gamescom.

As for online service, Microsoft was the clear-cut winner this generation, and Sony took notice. Sony has announced that a PlayStation Plus account is required to play online games on the PlayStation 4. That is OK, because alongside that announcement, Sony also talked about how it was working to restructure its online network to be more competitive with Microsoft’s.

Those who want bells and whistles and don’t mind paying an extra $100 for motion-sensing nonsense and the ability to run cable or satellite through an Xbox One  can go with Microsoft. Those who want a company dedicated to releasing top-notch games, allowing the use of streaming apps and a good system for delivering indie games should sate their appetite with Sony.

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