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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Faculty display own dance talents

NW dance instructor Amy Ross, back, and Lesley Snelson-Figueroa, guest artist, perform Turnin the Corner, choreographed by Ross and set to a Beastie Boys song.  Photo by Martina Treviño/The Collegian
NW dance instructor Amy Ross, back, and Lesley Snelson-Figueroa, guest artist, perform “Turnin’ the Corner,” choreographed by Ross and set to a Beastie Boys song. Photo by Martina Treviño/The Collegian

By Martina Treviño/reporter

NW dance instructor Amy Ross, back, and Lesley Snelson-Figueroa, guest artist, perform "Turnin' the Corner," choreographed by Ross and set to a Beastie Boys song.  Photo by Martina Treviño/The Collegian
NW dance instructor Amy Ross, back, and Lesley Snelson-Figueroa, guest artist, perform “Turnin’ the Corner,” choreographed by Ross and set to a Beastie Boys song. Photo by Martina Treviño/The Collegian

“Dancing the talk” is exactly what the NW dance faculty did March 12 with a faculty concert and a full day of workshops.

“The concert puts the faculty on the flip side, allowing students to see the work their teachers create, perform and communicate to the community,” Amy Ross, associate professor of dance, said.

Current, a dance choreographed by Ross, opened the program and was performed by Ross and guest artists Kiera Amison, Lesley Snelson-Figueroa and Meghan Cardwell-Wilson of Muscle Memory Dance Theatre, for which Ross is co-artistic director.

“We spend semesters teaching our students dance technique, performance qualities, choreographic choices,” she said. “We set expectations for our students that we are in turn held accountable for in a live performance.”

Ross’ piece was followed by a self-choreographed solo by Lacreacia Inez Sanders, associate professor of dance.

Titled Found, the performance endeavored to encourage the audience to “find their own shine,” Sanders said. The shine was represented by a small white bench, which was enveloped by light that the dancer struggled to reach and upon success found renewed energy.

The Rimes of the Ancient Gardeners followed. The husband and wife team Jeffrey Kaplan and Laurie Sanda, both NW Campus dance instructors, performed medieval tunes, accompanied by guitarist Dawn De Rycke. The performance piece blurs the boundaries of dance incorporating acting, singing and dancing, Kaplan said.

Male students were happy to have a representative on stage. “Thanks for representing us men on stage,” an unidentified student said to Kaplan at the reception that followed the concert. 

Linda Quinn, NW Campus associate professor of dance and humanities and founder of the TCC Northwest Dance Company, performed Raíces, a tap dance that paid tribute to the roots of tap, including traditional Spanish flamenco and African drum rhythms.

Ross and Sanders choreographed and performed Turnin’ the Corner and Trippin’ Out respectively. Ross was accompanied by Snelson-Figueroa in a contemporary dance inspired by special shoes Snelson-Figueroa wears because of an injury.

Holly Arnold, Kim Jackson and Cristy Jefferson of Phase 2 Dance Ensemble joined Sanders in an edgy comedic piece.

The performance strives to bring consciousness to racial relations and tensions in a funny way, Sanders said during a question-and-answer session after the concert.

In addition to the performance, students also were invited to attend workshops taught by the guest artists throughout the day.

“Guest artists … allow students to broaden their scope of artistry,” she said. “Students that become adapted to a faculty member’s teaching style will push themselves differently in a guest workshop.”

The performance was videotaped and will be available for viewing in the NW Campus Library.

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