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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Local relay event to aid cancer battle

Participants in the Detroit Relay for Life parade a sign through the gathering grounds before their race begins. The national event raises awareness for cancer research and collects money to donate to the American Cancer Society to find cures.  Photo courtesy Relay for Life
Participants in the Detroit Relay for Life parade a sign through the gathering grounds before their race begins. The national event raises awareness for cancer research and collects money to donate to the American Cancer Society to find cures. Photo courtesy Relay for Life

By Keisha McDuffie/ne news editor

Participants in the Detroit Relay for Life parade a sign through the gathering grounds before their race begins. The national event raises awareness for cancer research and collects money to donate to the American Cancer Society to find cures.  Photo courtesy Relay for Life
Participants in the Detroit Relay for Life parade a sign through the gathering grounds before their race begins. The national event raises awareness for cancer research and collects money to donate to the American Cancer Society to find cures. Photo courtesy Relay for Life

To say it takes only one person or one voice may sound cliché, but one man literally walked, jogged and ran his way his way into history.

Dr. Gordy Klatt, a colorectal surgeon in Tacoma, wanted to increase the income of the local American Cancer Society office, so he decided to raise money for the fight doing something he loves, running marathons.

The Relay for Life phenomenon began in 1985 when Klatt spent 24 hours circling University of Puget’s Baker Stadium track for more than 83 miles.

He raised $27,000 to help fight cancer. Now millions have joined in the fight, making the Relay for Life the largest fundraising event in history.

NE Campus will participate in this year’s Relay for Life at Trinity High School in Euless Friday, April 27, from 6 p.m. until 6 a.m. Saturday.

Anyone can join NE Campus president, Dr. Larry Darlage, and the North Easterners to raise money to help cure cancer.

This is the fifth year the Easterners have competed in the 12-hour fundraiser. NE Campus has 15 teachers participating in the event.

“ I would encourage anyone who has been touched by cancer to participate in the Relay for Life,” Darlage said. “The funds that are raised will help science find ways to cure the various forms of cancer.”

The relay brings people in a community together for a cause that has affected most everyone in one form or another. 

Lisa Uhlir, associate professor of government, is participating on the TCC North Easterners team for the second year in a row.

“ We hope to increase cancer awareness with the armbands and luminaries and raise funds so that more faculty and students can join the relay without having to worry about collecting donations,” she said.

“ On a smaller note, we are attempting to bring faculty and student teams together,” she said.

Someone can honor a cancer survivor, pay tribute to a lost life and raise money to contribute toward a future without cancer by signing up for the relay.

Anyone interested in joining the Easterners can visit one of the many booths at the Spring Fest 10 a.m.-2 p.m. April 17-18 by the chessboard. Or one can warm up for the actual relay with a mini version on NE Campus during the fest.

The team will sell $1 luminaries for students to decorate and dedicate to a friend or loved one who has died of cancer.

The group will also have a wishing well, where people can toss pennies and make wishes.

Those looking to repay their professors for popping a quiz can donate to the “make your professor sweat” fund.

To sign up, visit www.acsevents.org, and click on the link to the relay at Trinity High School.

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