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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

South celebrates women in service during symposium

Georgia+Phillips%2FThe+Collegian++Former+TCC+students+and+now+business+vendors+sold+products+during+the+Women%E2%80%99s+Symposium+on+South+Campus+March+29.+
Georgia Phillips/The Collegian Former TCC students and now business vendors sold products during the Women’s Symposium on South Campus March 29.

By Remy McCool/south news editor

Georgia Phillips/The Collegian  Vendors set up booths in the South Campus Living Room and cafeteria during the Women’s Symposium March 29.
Georgia Phillips/The Collegian Vendors set up booths in the South Campus Living Room and cafeteria during the Women’s Symposium March 29.
Georgia Phillips/The Collegian  Former TCC students and now business vendors sold products during the Women’s Symposium on South Campus March 29.
Georgia Phillips/The Collegian Former TCC students and now business vendors sold products during the Women’s Symposium on South Campus March 29.

Students and community members gathered March 29 for the South Campus Women’s Symposium to honor women and the services they provide in their communities.

Guest speaker Judge Bobbie Edmonds along with a panel discussion and exhibits showcased the many women who have helped others while following their passion.

“We as women are always servants, of our family and of our community,” Edmonds said.

Following registration and breakfast, the opening session included the dedication of the newly renamed Wanda Hill Women’s History Month Scholarship.

“The whole experience is dedicated to the memory and legacy of Wanda Hill,” psychology associate professor Triesha Light said.

As a South Campus government associate professor from 1987 to 2013, Hill also served on many committees throughout her time at TCC, including Women’s History Month and TCC’s Technology Committee.

Described as a strong, elegant and modest lady, Hill never expected recognition or praise for her ideas, Light said.

“Wanda never wanted me to give her credit in front of the group,” Light said. “Many of the good ideas we had came from her.”

Sam Hill, Wanda’s husband, and other members of their family were present to support the renaming of the scholarship.

“She really cared about education. She really cared about those of us that were industrious and wanted to work,” Sam Hill said. “She was just a fantastic person to be around for 28 years.”

A student leader, local political activists and a judge served as members on the Women in Politics panel discussion

The panelists spoke on the challenges they faced as women while working toward the positions they hold today. They encouraged women to believe in themselves, get involved and work together to improve their communities.

“Women need to start helping each other instead of hurting each other,” Tarrant County Judge Deborah Nekhom said.

Attendees were given time to visit more than 20 exhibits and network with women business owners prior to the general session.

Several vendors were former TCC students who are now business owners. Businesses and organizations represented included Young Living Essential Oils, Girl Scouts and Merry Heart Face Painting.

Edmonds, who is also an author and attorney, spoke during the event’s general session.

Edmonds grew up in rural Louisiana with her parents who did not finish high school. Her parents were adamant about their children achieving everything that they could not. Throughout her education and into her career, they have remained a constant source of support.

“They had the wisdom and the insight to encourage their children to go further than they had come,” she said. “They gave us the motivation and prayers to push us forward when we thought we couldn’t achieve.”

As a child, Edmonds dreamed of traveling and being on the cover of a magazine. She recognized that an education would allow her to get there and put her in the “driver’s seat.”

Attending Southern University in Baton Rouge on a scholarship, Edmonds earned her bachelor’s degree in interior design. She went on to earn her juris doctorate from Southern’s School of Law.

She covered topics such as child custody, wills and servicing others.

“No matter how high you go, always reach back and lift and extend a helping hand to someone less fortunate,” she said.

Many women have found themselves being called “bossy” because of their persistence, specifically in the workplace, Edmonds said.

“It’s just being aggressive. It’s just being assertive, and so I don’t want that word ‘bossy’ to taint your mental ability and break your self-confidence,” she said.

Edmonds wrote The Legal Navigator specifically for parents.

“I wrote this book because I wanted parents to be proactive,” she said.

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