The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Test helps match personality to job

By Steven Long/reporter

Finding a job that fits one’s personality will aid in career success a NW Campus outplacement counselor said last week.

Dr. Shelly Cavin presented Picking a Career That Matches Your Personality April 17. She provided information for students interested in learning what careers suit their personality.

“ Having a job that’s outside of your personality type is like trying to write with your non-dominant hand,” she said.

Students took a short personality test. The 36-question type-indictor quiz is a shortened adaptation of the Myers-Briggs personality test. The test analyzes personality traits and assigns a four-letter code to each personality type. Each letter represents one aspect of an individual’s personality.

All of the 16 personality types have different careers suited for them, Cavin said.

The test asks students to determine where their energy is directed, how they process the information, how they make decisions and how they organize their lives.

For example, an INTP is introverted, intuitive, thinking and perceptive. Someone with this personality type will likely be interested in theoretical or scientific pursuits, according to Cavin’s handouts. Albert Einstein was an INTP.

The opposite of an INTP is an ESFJ. These personalities are extroverted, sensing, feeling and judging (not judgmental). ESFJ’s tend to be popular, warm-hearted and talkative. According to the handouts, ESFJ’s are well suited for a career in education or law.

Because the Myers-Briggs personality test is so extensive, students who want to learn more can go to www.kiersey.com, where they can learn about famous people who share their personality types.

“ No matter what career you go into, you have to be a good communicator,” Cavin said.

“ Even if your career isn’t on the list [I handed out], it doesn’t mean you can’t be good at it. You are just going to have to find your own niche in whatever career you choose.”

Donate to The Collegian

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tarrant County College. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Collegian