The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

MOVIE REVIEW – Kevin Smith film dark, twisted but worth watching

By Rodrigo Valverde/reporter

Tusk, directed by Kevin Smith, is one of those films that people will go into not knowing what to expect and leave the theater shocked and amazed at what they just watched.

The movie follows Justin Long’s character Wallace Bryton, a podcast host, as he travels to Canada for an exclusive interview only to find that his interviewee has been killed. Sitting at a bar, desperate for a story to go home with, he finds a room-for-rent ad in the bathroom that has some interesting background on the renter.
Intrigued, Wallace decides to take a risk and find this man not knowing what lies ahead of him. He soon discovers that Howard Howe, the renter played by Michael Parks, is not all he seems to be, and that he is more psychotic than Wallace would’ve guessed.

Tusk pulls the viewer in from the very beginning and does not let go for a second. The movie starts off like a lighthearted comedy with jokes and humor that will have the whole audience laughing but takes a very dark twist that slowly unravels and only gets more intense as the movie progresses.

This is definitely Smith’s most creepy, twisted and demented film yet, and it is not for everyone. While the movie is hard to watch at times, it will keep viewers invested with its story, characters and tension. It incorporates flashback scenes very well to help develop the characters to the audience.

The film features exceptional performances from the entire cast, including an unexpected actor who almost steals the show. But the standout performances are those of stars Long and Parks.
Long owns his character in what has to be his most physically demanding role yet. Parks also becomes his character as the antagonist, and one that at times elicits sympathy.

The supporting characters are strong as well and offer good comic relief with their funny, but subtle humor.

It’s hard to recommend rushing out to theaters Sept. 19 to watch this, simply because of its dark and twisted nature, but it’s one that could be a worthwhile backup choice.

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