The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

South explains politics through theatrical lens

From+left+to+right%2C+Bryan+Angton%2C+Victoria+Nearn%2C+Shyane+Hammel%2C+Hope+Rosser+and+Scott+Wild+rehearse+for+South%E2%80%99s+original+play+We+the+People+that+runs+Sept.+29-+Oct.+1.Peter+Matthews%2FThe+Collegian
From left to right, Bryan Angton, Victoria Nearn, Shyane Hammel, Hope Rosser and Scott Wild rehearse for South’s original play We the People that runs Sept. 29- Oct. 1.

Peter Matthews/The Collegian

By Hannah Lathen/ campus editor

From left to right, Bryan Angton, Victoria Nearn, Shyane Hammel, Hope Rosser and Scott Wild rehearse for South’s original play We the People that runs Sept. 29- Oct. 1.Peter Matthews/The Collegian
From left to right, Bryan Angton, Victoria Nearn, Shyane Hammel, Hope Rosser and Scott Wild rehearse for South’s original play We the People that runs Sept. 29- Oct. 1.
Peter Matthews/The Collegian

We the People, an original play researched, written and acted by students, is South’s opening theater production.

South theater director Melinda Benton-Muller says the play will help students understand this year’s election.

“I tried to choose things that are relevant for my students who are on the stage but especially for the students who, for many of them, this is their very first live theater experience,” she said. “This is something that’s relevant to their lives.”

The play occurs in present day with a group of students trying to work their way through the election for a class assignment.

Student Scott Wild, an actor in the play and also the student assistant director, further explained the setup.

“We walk on stage and basically we’re giving this presentation — and I won’t give away too much of the quote-unquote story — we’re giving this presentation for government class, and we’re meeting to do that,” he said. “It just has little bits and pieces we weaved together, that we found or wrote ourselves. So it’s a compiled structure.”

The actors play themselves but still portray characters each presenting different points of view. The play discusses current world issues right now while keeping it lighthearted.

We the People is Bryan Angton’s fourth play at TCC.

“I have some serious parts, but I still want to make them laugh,” he said. “You know, make them have a good time.”

Student Victoria Nearn says she wants the audience to leave with a new perspective.

“You should expect to see things in a different light,” she said, “things that you thought about the election that you’re going to realize you didn’t realize before.”

Tickets are free for TCC students, faculty and staff, $3 for seniors and non-TCC students and $6 to the public. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 29-Oct. 1 in the Joe B. Rushing Center for Performing Arts. No one will be seated late. People with sensitivity to strobe lights should beware.

Children are welcome, but the play will include adult language and content matter.

Donate to The Collegian

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tarrant County College. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Collegian