The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

CD Review

By Frankie Farrar-Helm/entertainment editor

A band that has fought through hell to stay together, Crossfade has finally merged again to record an intense, emotional album that has brought them closer than ever.

After being cut from Columbia Records in 2008, lead singer Ed Sloan fell into a deep depression and isolated himself from the music industry, leaving his band members astray.

Lead keyboardist and guitarist Les Hall is credited with rejuvenating Sloan’s musical appeal and masterminding the recording of We All Bleed.

The album’s 10 tracks, produced by the South Carolina-based band, maintain the sonic atmosphere of Crossfade‘s previous music. The album is an innovative fusion of symphonic elements, a flourish of keyboards and the band’s guitar-grinding signature sound — thanks to the addition of Hall and talented drummer Mark Castillo, alongside Sloan and bassist Mitch James.

Highlights on We All Bleed include “Dear Cocaine,” a slow burner that addresses Sloan’s letting go of addiction. “I hate the day we ever met … The times with you I’ll just forget,” Sloan sings.

“Killing Me Inside,” a classic Crossfade rock ‘n’ roll anthem with a touch of crafty orchestration, is the story of an ex-girlfriend haunting his dreams.

The last track, “Make Me a Believer,” is a powerful, 10-minute, intricate description about the process of getting high. Starting slow and tranquil, Sloan asks, “Will it make me feel right? … Will it solve all my problems?” Then the song dramatically transforms into a firestorm of heavy drums and various up-and-down, bipolar guitar notes as Sloan sings, “Because it makes me feel right … Because it solves all my problems.” It ends in a high-pitch, mile-a-minute temper tantrum and swaying violin melody as Sloan says, “It’s in his blood … underneath his skin.”

Overall, We All Bleed is an original piece of music that displays all aspects of the band. Sloan and his group have a lot to say, and they’re screaming it from the top of their lungs.

Fans saddened by the band’s falling out shouldn’t worry. Crossfade isn’t going anywhere any time soon.

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