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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Women’s luncheon discusses politics, Eleanor Roosevelt

By Andrew Forbes/ reporter

The National Women’s March discussion on TR drew a large crowd. Several attendees asked panelists questions about their experiences and reasons for becoming active.
Photos by Peter Matthews/The Collegian

A South history assistant professor spoke March 9 to students and faculty members about International Women’s History Month, persistence and one of the most influential women in history, Eleanor Roosevelt.

Carolyn Carney talked about the history and significance of Women’s History Month. Carney believed this year’s was the most timely and significant Women’s History Month luncheon to date.

“It’s been a rough year for women especially in politics, from our president making misogynistic remarks to Sen. [Elizabeth] Warren being told to shut up during a Senate meeting,” Carney said.

Carney also showed a clip of Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell saying about Warner: “She was warned. She was given an explanation, but nevertheless, she persisted.”

Carney added McConnell’s comments about how women who are persistent and never give up are vital using Roosevelt as an example of a woman who proved to be persistent.

Carney talked about the adversity Roosevelt faced at age 9 when her parents died. She also dealt with challenges from her husband, former president Franklin Roosevelt.

TCC employee Leah Price talks about her efforts to help organize the Fort Worth women’s march as panelists Molly Bartell and Leslie Lutz listen.

“Eleanor later went on to find out that Franklin had been having an affair, but she stayed with him for the sake of Franklin’s political career,” Carney said.

Roosevelt also played an influential role in American politics during her husband’s presidency.

“She had a huge impact on the New Deal being created and gave Franklin different ideas for the deal,” Carney said.

After her husband’s death, Roosevelt remained active in public life, standing up for women’s rights by holding separate press conferences for women because they were not allowed to report on White House affairs. Roosevelt also played a role in drafting the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

“Eleanor could have been a complacent first lady but, instead, broke the established rules and remained persistent, and by doing so, social rights improved,” Carney said.

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