The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Counselor shows how to de-stress

By Jazmyn Davis/ reporter

TR counselor Mandy Melton talks with students March 23 about how to manage problems and stress in different areas of one’s life.
Sendy Serrano/The Collegian

Better Ways to Stress March 23 offered students tips on managing problems from school, work, relationships and even home.

TR Campus counselor Mandy Melton let students know that stress is not unique. It is easy for students to feel as though they are alone when dealing with situations that no one else is dealing with. It is also easy to think no one cares.

As people continue in life, they are put through many unexpected obstacles. Mental stress can lead to behavioral stress if it is not conquered at the start, Melton said.

Many people do not realize medical symptoms such as nausea, insomnia or eating too little or too much show up with stress, she said.

Melton cited a Harvard study that reported stress plays a part in gray matter reduction, which plays a big part in memory as well as the skill to make executive decisions.

Behavioral differences become noticeable when stress occurs as well, she said. It is possible to become depressed, confused, suffer from mood swings or take part in drug and alcohol indulgence to relieve that tension.

Procrastination is also a problem that occurs due to being stressed, Melton said. It is easy to get overwhelmed and give out completely on what needs to be done.

Some people isolate themselves mentally as well as physically when they are overwhelmed with stress. With that isolation, it becomes harder for someone to help people because they are not open to others.

“Stress does not have to be dealt with by your lonesome,” she said.

People tend to shut out others’ help when, in fact, help from others is one of the top ways to become less anxious.

Stress can be relieved in plausible ways, Melton said. Taking time away from whatever the issue is for self regroup, speaking to a trusted person, dealing with emotions, knowledge with preparation, attitude and outlook are all ways to better manage stress.

“Learn to manage stress from your peers,” she said. “Stress does not have to rule your mind and actions.”

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