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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

NW theater brings family aspect to dark drama with twins

NW+theater+brings+family+aspect+to+dark+drama+with+twins

By Kelli Henderson/entertainment editor

Theatre Northwest is bringing a whole new meaning to family entertainment.

Identical twin sisters take the stage Oct. 10-14 to open the season with Getting Out, a dark drama.

Arlene, the main character of Getting Out, is in her late 20s and fresh out of prison. As she comes back into society, she tries to shun her old life as the rebellious Arlie in search of a new and better one.

Director Brent Alford said part of the reason he was drawn to this play was he knew of the twin students, Makynzie and Sydney Davis, who were starting at TCC as freshmen this semester.

“Two versions of that character [Arlene] exist simultaneously throughout the play,” he said. “They’re being played by twin sisters, identical twins. That’s why I picked the play. I knew they were coming.”

Both Makynzie and Sydney said they did not know Alford had chosen the play with them in mind but are having fun in the lead roles.

To prepare for their roles as Arlene, each playing different ages, they had to put themselves in the mindset of the characters.

Makynzie, who plays Arlene as a young girl, said it is hard for her to play someone significantly younger than herself.

“I mean, playing someone so young and being this tall, it’s all in how I play it,” she said. “It’s like a voice change and physical characteristics, how I move.”

Alford said another reason for picking the play is because it shines a light on dark subjects many may pull away from.

“Like any great drama, the point is to enlighten the audience,” he said. “It gives them a chance to see this side of the world that we often overlook.”

Cat Whitehead plays a prison guard named Benny, who is in love with Arlene. He said he was in the children’s show last spring, and this show is very different.

“I’ve really had to step outside of myself for this character and just try to put myself in scenarios that I would never put myself in,” he said. “And that’s kind of the beauty I love about it because it is stretching me to my limit as an actor, I believe, because I have never done anything like this before.”

Rachel Daniel, who plays Arlene’s mother, said the scenes can really get to the actors.

“It’s definitely a smack in the face of awareness,” she said. “It’s been very emotional for a lot of us in our scenes because it is so heavy and so hurtful. You cry and you get the shakes, and just to think you have to get yourself in that mindset, and it’s very upsetting sometimes.”

Whitehead said he hopes that students who do see the play can, if not relate to Arlene’s story, think twice before casting a judgmental light on someone with a rough history.

“Once they are out, everyone from their old lives are told not to associate with them, and now no one will associate with them in the future because they’re ex-convicts,” Whitehead said. “You see her [Arlene] trying her best to turn over this new leaf and not do the things she used to do or have to go back to that life that she left behind, but, ultimately in the end, you’re almost like, ‘I see why she would go back.’ There’s nowhere else to go.”

Makynzie Davis said she believes a major theme of the play is hope. Change is also prevalent in the play, Sydney Davis said.

“I think one of the messages, I guess, is that anyone can change,” she said. “There’s always a chance for you to get back up there and have a second chance.”

Proceeds from the show will go to SafeHaven, an organization that deals with the needs of victims of domestic abuse in Tarrant County.

Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. There will be a reception and meet-and-greet with the cast Oct. 14. Tickets are $6 for general public, $3 for non-TCC students and seniors and free for TCC students, faculty and staff. 

Getting Out is not suitable for children.

For reservations, call the box office at 817-515-7724.

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