The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Symposium will face volatile 1968

President+Lyndon+Johnson+works+during+his+final+days+at+the+White+House+in+1968.+He+chose+not+to+seek+another+term+as+the+Vietnam+War+became+more+unpopular.
President Lyndon Johnson works during his final days at the White House in 1968. He chose not to seek another term as the Vietnam War became more unpopular. Photo courtesy Lyndon Baines Johnson Library/National Archives/MCT

By Jamil Oakford/managing editor

Political assassinations, protests and civil unrest will be at the center of the History Symposium Feb. 22-23 on TR Campus.

TCC students, faculty and staff can learn about the historical context of the year 1968.
“People think things are devastating and horrible now, but the ‘60s were pretty horrible, too,” TR history, government and philosophy chair Chad Wooley said.

The conference, organized by Wooley and Tarleton State University history professor Christopher Hickman, will focus on the issues that made the 1960s such a volatile era, Wooley said.

The National Guard meets angry protesters at the Democratic National Convention in 1968. Unrest came after the assassinations of Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr.
The National Guard meets angry protesters at the Democratic National Convention in 1968. Unrest came after the assassinations of Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr.
Photo courtesy Walter Kale/Chicago Tribune/TNS

“We’re going to have a wide variety of topics: political assassinations, civil rights leaders, the protests and their link with the protests we see now with Colin Kaepernick,” he said.

The symposium opens with keynote speaker Bruce J. Schulman, a Boston University history professor, in the Action Suites at 7:15 p.m. The next day, a series of panels will run from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. with a lunch break.

Panels will focus on political unrest and other key movements that took place in the 1960s, Wooley said. The rise of feminism and a look at Fort Worth during that time period will also be topics of discussion, he said.

Wooley said this seemed like a fitting time to look back 50 years and assess where the country is now versus then.

“I hope they [attendees] get a better understanding of the ‘60s,” he said. “Any time you can understand the past, it benefits you and everyone else.”

Donate to The Collegian

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tarrant County College. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Collegian