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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Immigration, race history in America subject of lecture

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The Collegian logo

By Jordan Reber/reporter

Speaker discusses troubled past

Interesting fact about the history of U.S. immigration — President Donald Trump’s father was one of seven arrested at an anti-immigration rally in New York City in the early 20th century, a speaker said during the “A More Perfect Union: Race in American History” event Feb. 14 on NW Campus.

Former Furman University president David Shi spoke to students Feb. 14 on NW Campus about immigration over the course of U.S. history, which he said has been a troubling topic. He hoped to give a deeper understanding of how immigration has changed and developed over time.

“One of the great myths Americans have long had about this country is that everyone else in the world wants to come here and that every newcomer has been welcome,” Shi said.

But not every foreigner wants to come to the U.S., and he said with all the drama going on with border patrol, it’s obvious that America isn’t as welcoming as it  once was.

When the U.S. was first established, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington had disputed who should be let in.

Jefferson argued some immigrants wouldn’t be able to adapt to the American Way, while Washington concluded that people of all races, cultures, whether they be rich or poor, would be welcomed into the U.S., Shi said.

“Some go back because the U.S. is not what they were expecting,” Shi said.

Shi explored the role of the Ku Klux Klan throughout U.S. history. In 1927, The KKK once had a march of 10,000 members through New York City, and the spectators were full of immigrants and Catholics, he said.

Seven people were arrested during the event.

NW student Eric Simmons said it was interesting to find that Trump’s father, Fred, was one of the seven members arrested during the New York City march.

“I don’t know how our president could get elected with that being the case,” he said.

Shi said people of the same descent showed hate towards their own people, just because they couldn’t see the beauty in what immigration could be in the U.S.

“We must open our hearts and think about what we really want to do about this issue,” Shi said.

NW student Ricky Chapman said he appreciated the amount of information on the topic that was delivered.

“The presentation was amazing,” Chapman said. “The insight he gives to our history as Americans is invaluable.”

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