The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Students learn about cultural injustices

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December 4, 2019 | Krissia Palomo | campus editor

Intercultural Network coordinator Marjeanna Burge took the stage at NSTU Center Corner Nov. 20 during the Creating Understanding event as part of a series of Native American Heritage Month events.

“I may be one of the few Native people you’ll see in your lifetime,” Burge said. “Unless you intentionally seek the culture out and the people to learn more.”

Burge’s objective was to inform those who may not understand Native American history, culture and struggles they face as a minority group in America.

When pointing out the insensitivity shown to the Native American community in society, she expressed negative feelings about seeing her culture being used as a Halloween costume, turned into team names or school spirit themes.

“My culture is not your Halloween costume,” Burge said before going on to explain the extensive amount of work that goes into making Native American head regalia, and the meaning it serves for a lot of members of the community.

Burge also took the opportunity to explain the meaning behind the Dakota Access Pipeline protests.

Although attendance was low due to the end of the semester and finals being around the corner, those who attended found the discussion educational.

NE student Gisella Carcamo said she thinks it’s beneficial for TCC to host events educating students about minority groups that are often overlooked or silenced.

“I chose to attend this event because I thought it’d be the most informative,” Carcamo said.

NE student and Intercultural Network member Mariah Campos said that even though she has a personal relationship with Burge, she learned a lot about her heritage that she previously did not know. She also said she enjoyed learning about the Dakota Access Pipeline protests because she is an environmental science major.

“Awareness and education are integral for students here to be a part of,” Campos said. “Even if people don’t go to these events, they know that they’re going on, and they can feel included.”

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