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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Exhibit reconstructs art pieces

February 19, 2020 | Elyssa Gideon | reporter

 

Christian Garza/The Collegian. South assistant art professor Earline Green explains her works to visiting patrons during the reception Feb. 13.

More than an art exhibit, the H. Wilson Legacy Revisited: Reception is about shedding light on a legacy that most have never heard of. Pottery stamped with Wilson’s name “almost brought a tear” to the eye of Wilson’s great-granddaughter, Veryl Wilson Inman, unexpectedly in attendance at the exhibit at South Campus on Feb. 13.

South assistant professor of fine arts ceramics Earline Green started her journey in researching these slave potters in 1991 while attending grad school at Texas Woman’s University.

“Back then, we didn’t have the resources for research like we do now,” Green said.

Over the years, she found little tidbits of information here and there until 2017, after she had discovered “they [slave potters] actually existed and they actually had names,” Green attended the Seguin Pecan Festival pottery show and was inspired.

Green created pottery inspired by H. Wilson and stamped with his name to “celebrate the Wilson legacy.”

A few recent graduates from the Interior Design program at South Campus attended and decorated the lobby space to flow with

 the galley space.

Christian Garza/The Collegian.

“I would have come anyway, I love art,” South student Jennifer Winters said.

South interior design adjunct professor Millie Harris wanted the lobby space to flow perfectly into the gallery space, which is why they pulled additional ceramics created by students in Green’s class to fill the lobby.

The gallery was set up with each wall correlating pictures of the original pieces, currently housed at The Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, with the sites where they were found, Green said. She had the jugs she created, staged in the middle.

“The forms were inspired by H. Wilson & Co.,” Green said. “I mainly did the jugs because they’re harder, and I wanted to push myself.”

Although there was a lot to learn about ceramics and the H. Wilson & Co. legacy, students also noticed Green’s enthusiasm for this topic. 

Christian Garza/The Collegian.

“What really caught my attention was her [Green’s] sabbatical, her commitment and passions shows,” South student Kristina Williams said.

Green’s mission is to spread the H. Wilson & Co. story about the emancipated slaves that started the first African-American owned business in Texas, and it is far from over.

“I have barely scratched the surface. When I retire, this will be my next job,” she said.

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