The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

It takes both sides for marriages to thrive

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By Lissette Salgado/campus editor

When I grew up, my parents influenced the idea of a dream marriage.

Both sides of the bride’s family and future in-laws sit at the pews of the church and wait for the ceremony to begin. The tuxedo on her partner looks stunning as rays of sunlight pour into the church from stained glass windows, shining at the perfect angle.

The exhilaration flows with the wedding music as she slowly marches towards her future spouse and the priest. Afterward, she is now married to the partner of her dreams, looking into each other’s loving eyes. Happily ever after.

Not every relationship that turns into marriage works because connections are complex. Marriages must endure the passage of time and the changes that result to be healthy and successful.

A well-planned wedding will not make all worries and stress disappear forever, nor any underlying problems that have yet been resolved.

While marriage can be about long-term contentment and happy endings, it is never guaranteed. It takes equal contributions of closeness and understanding and the willingness to adapt and grow with each other.

Yet, it may not be enough if one side fails to do their part while the other contributes more to the relationship.

Despite marriage being viewed as the ultimate bond between two individuals, it does not mean that it is absolutely required to hold a steady and healthy relationship together.

Some couples don’t get married and are doing better than their legally married counterparts without a fancy ceremony or a court document proving their deep affection for each other.

Nevertheless, there are people that continue to stay with their partner despite the absence of love for the sake of their children or the wishful thinking that it will get better.

A successful partnership comes from a deep understanding of their partner and the willingness to change themselves for the betterment of their relationship, not an expensive wedding.

Maintaining compassion for each other alleviates the strain of alienation and incompatibility. Working to preserve a marriage is worth it, but unnecessary for a wonderful relationship.

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