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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

High school students feel mixed about digital SAT

Students+taking+a+test+at+the+SE+testing+center+Feb.+1.+Joel+Solis%2FThe+Collegian
Students taking a test at the SE testing center Feb. 1. Joel Solis/The Collegian
Students taking a test at the SE testing center Feb. 1. Joel Solis/The Collegian
Students taking a test at the SE testing center Feb. 1.
Joel Solis/The Collegian

Juan Salinas II
campus editor
juan.salinas465@my.tccd.edu

The College Board announced that the SAT will be fully digital by 2024, and opinions are somewhat mixed. 

“If doing class in quarantine has taught me anything, it’s that the world is evolving into a technology-focused society and that at this point it’s not about how I feel, but instead, how I can adapt,” said Makayla Johnson, Marine Creek Collegiate High School junior. 

The test will be shortened to two hours instead of three, and results will be released in a couple of days rather than weeks, according to a statement on the College Board website. 

A growing number of four-year universities are making the SAT an optional part of the admission process. Seventy-five percent of four-year colleges and universities will not require it from Fall 2022 applicants, according to the education-focused organization Fair Test. 

MCCHS college and career readiness coach Kierney Buchanan hopes the SAT going digital will make the test more relevant and more easily accessible to every student. 

“I don’t think SAT scores should be the only thing universities look at when accepting or denying a student admission,” Buchanan said. “Office of admissions should take a look at the student as a whole. Do a more holistic approach to their acceptances.”  

MCCHS sophomore Jeffrey Munoz is relieved the SAT is going digital but has concerns that it will make it more difficult for colleges to pick qualified students. 

“Putting it in an online state can cause exploits and maybe fraudulent scores,” Munoz said. 

MCCHS junior Jazmine Gonzalez prefers taking tests on pencil and paper.  

“It gives me a sense of relief knowing that I can jot down my thought process on paper,” she said. “I’ve done tests before online, however, I never got the same satisfaction like I do on paper. I feel, for me, that online it’s more tiring because you stare at a screen for hours, and it can be a distraction. From what I’ve heard from friends and other students in general, not many of them enjoy taking tests as well online either.”

Eighty percent of students found the digital SAT to be less stressful, according to the College Board. 

MCCHS senior Klarrisa Orozco thinks it will be a positive thing but has questions about how the College Board will deal with several variables that come with online test-taking.  

“I think it would be best to get rid of the tests so students won’t be so stressed all the time and judged based on test scores,” Orozco said.

MCCHS junior Evelyn Vasquez isn’t entirely convinced by the digital transition but isn’t opposed to it. She said it will take away unnecessary anxiety from her while taking the test, but it loses some of its legitimacy.

“Going from hearing flipping pages to clicking keys will definitely be a big change,” Vasquez said.

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