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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Fashion industry has blatant double standard for hijabs

Fashion industry has blatant double standard for hijabs Raamin ka/unsplash
Fashion industry has blatant double standard for hijabs
Raamin ka/unsplash

RABBIA MOLAI
campus editor
rabbia.molai@my.tccd.edu

French Vogue’s blatant double standard regarding the hijab has caused major controversy in the Muslim community. 

 Vogue France posted a photo on Instagram Jan. 28 of Julia Fox wearing a scarf on her head with the caption “Yes to the headscarf!” The caption was later deleted but not before mainstream media picked it apart, pointing out the obvious hypocrisy since the week before the post, France had banned the hijab from being worn in sports competitions.

The use of head coverings in mainstream media as a fashion statement has become increasingly popular. From TikTok trends to the covers of high fashion magazines, it seems the only place where head coverings aren’t becoming more accepted is on the heads of Muslim women.

The hijab is a religious head covering worn by Muslim women to symbolize their faith, not only on a personal level, but also on a public level. Hijabi women are some of the most easily recognizable people in a crowd, and that is something they take great pride in, regardless of the persecution they may face because of it.

You would assume since the world has jumped on the live and let live train that the philosophy would apply to all women, but unfortunately, you would be wrong. Because apparently if a non-Muslim woman decides to wear a scarf around her head as a fashion statement, it is socially acceptable. However, when a Muslim woman wears a scarf on her head for her religious beliefs, it’s dangerous, oppressive and to some, even unAmerican.

Obviously, Muslim women don’t own the headscarf, but the issue isn’t who shouldn’t wear one, it’s everyone should be able to wear whatever they would like without the fear of discrimination.

The post by Vogue France, though upsetting, did have one upside. Because of the post’s popularity, it highlighted an issue that may have already been prevalent in the Muslim community but unknown to many outside of it. Once the hypocrisy started to gain notice, there was an onslaught of people from all over the world of every age, race and religion ready to hold one of the oldest pillars of fashion accountable for its contrasting principles. 

One person in particular who has been using her platform to speak on several issues faced by Muslim women has been supermodel Bella Hadid. She has made numerous posts on her Instagram recently talking about the rise of headscarves in mainstream media and fashion.

Although different forms of the hijab and head coverings are starting to make an appearance in fashion, let’s still remember the daily struggle, abuse and discrimination Muslim women face on a regular basis because of their faith and what they stand for,”  Hadid wrote. “Although fashion is a way to push the boundaries and somehow make things more acceptable, I want us to remember where the hijab resonated from and why it is so important to Muslim women worldwide.”

At the end of the day, the way we all choose to express ourselves through our fashion choices should be exactly that, our choice. No one should be made to feel persecuted for the way they choose to dress, and hijabs should be included in that narrative.

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