The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Community college and university students discuss the differences in their social lives

TCC SE upper floors and a UTA walkway shows the student life on each of the campuses and shows the difference between them. Joel Solis (left) and KJ Means (right)/The Collegian
TCC SE upper floors and a UTA walkway shows the student life on each of the campuses and shows the difference between them. Joel Solis (left) and KJ Means (right)/The Collegian
TCC SE upper floors and a UTA walkway shows the student life on each of the campuses and shows the difference between them. Joel Solis (left) and KJ Means (right)/The Collegian
TCC SE upper floors and a UTA walkway shows the student life on each of the campuses and shows the difference between them.
Joel Solis (left) and KJ Means (right)/The Collegian

KEYLA HOLMES
campus editor
keyla.holmes@my.tccd.edu

Along with the many differences between universities and community colleges, the contrasts of students’ social lives and the party scene of the school can be more apparent. 

Despite students acknowledging this, some still have a positive outlook on their community college experience.

“I can say that my social life at TCC is pretty fun,” SE Campus student Tam Ho said.“The easiest way for me to make friends is to join clubs.”

Participating in clubs and organizations offered at campuses can make it easier for students struggling to make connections at a commuter school like TCC.  

“My social life at TCC is very abundant, however, I would say my involvement on campus with clubs and activities has helped immensely when it comes to making new friends and building connections with other students,” SE student Xander Todd said.

It can be easier said than done to simply suggest that students should join a club if they are struggling with making friends and having fun while at community college.

“I think because TCC has many campuses, when they advertise clubs or organizations I don’t really pay attention because most of the time the organization is at a campus that is pretty out of the way for me,” SE student Ravion Shepard said. “I think universities might have it a little easier in that regard.”

Due to the many campuses TCC has, finding a club of interest that isn’t too far away can be a challenge that students at universities may not have.

“All dorm halls hold events daily as well as study groups in the lobby,” UTA student Aysha Mirza said. “This made it easy to just walk downstairs from my room to meet up with friends to play pool or study with my roommates.”

Not only can finding the right club be easier on UTA students, but they also have the opportunity to build relationships with those interested in pursuing the same major.

“The university also requires all freshmen to take a major based course class their first semester,” Mirza said. “This is a class with students of all the same major to learn about resources and clubs on campus, and make friends within our own community,” she said.

Going out of one’s way to make friends and learn about the resources available to TCC students may be the best way to make the most out of one’s social life on campus.

“It can be hard at times as some people are simply too shy and nervous to make those connections,”  Todd said. “But it really just takes realizing everyone is in the same boat at the end of the day.”

Some TCC students already involved in clubs care about getting more people to join different groups and activities.

“As a student worker, my friends and I always promote events and encourage students to join,” Ho said. “We always want students to succeed, have fun and engage.”

Community college students also may not have the opportunity to experience the stereotypical party scene known to be more of an experience associated with large universities.

“I think the party scene is non-existent unless you happen to be friends with people at that party,” Shepard said. “We don’t have many events that would allow a party scene to flourish at TCC like most universities that have homecoming and sports games,” she said.

“FOMO”, a common acronym used to describe the fear of missing out, can be a prominent feeling for those having to watch their peers experience some of the more movie – like college experiences.

“Sometimes I feel like I miss out on the ‘true college experience’ by going to TCC, so I wouldn’t be surprised if other students felt that as well,” Shepard said. “When you see everyone attending homecoming games and parties, it’s pretty easy to feel like you’ve made the wrong choice in attending a community college.”

Due to the environment university students tend to be in, it’s no secret that throwing parties may be easier for multiple reasons.

“A lot of students live in apartments on campus therefore it may be easier to throw parties,” Mirza said. “I think typically students at community college live at home, so it may be harder to get out or even throw parties.”

Despite “FOMO” and the lack of parties at TCC, Todd said that he still believes there are enjoyable experiences to be had.

“I am someone who loves to experience and I am a chronic FOMO fighter, and at times I have felt there are things I am missing out on at TCC compared to those at universities, but I genuinely believe if you make the best out of it there’s nothing to miss,” he said. “I have fun everyday on campus.”

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