The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Love, friendship lurk among class schedules, books, exams

Love%2C+friendship+lurk+among+class+schedules%2C+books%2C+exams

By Karen gavis/editor-in-chief

Before dating, NW students Kayla Fuller and Tyler Ferguson were enrolled in the same TCC dance class, where they were partnered.Carrie Duke/The Collegian
Before dating, NW students Kayla Fuller and Tyler Ferguson were enrolled in the same TCC dance class, where they were partnered.Carrie Duke/The Collegian

When NW students Tyler Ferguson and Kayla Fuller enrolled in Lacreacia Sanders’ dance class last year, they bonused.

Sanders had divided her class into groups of four, Fuller said, but there were two extra students, so she and Ferguson paired up.

“At first, she didn’t really like me,” Ferguson said. “I don’t really know why.”

Ferguson said he thought Fuller was a really colorful person. The two danced together and also added each other on Facebook.

Since they needed to plan their project, the two exchanged numbers after class and began texting one another, Fuller said.

“And then, we started texting about stuff that didn’t really have anything to do

with class, and then he asked me out,” she said. “He asked me out last Valentine’s Day.”

Cupid hit a bull’s-eye.

Love can be found amid books, classes and schedules on college

Ronald and Kristin Byrd teach biology on NE Campus. The two met in graduate school and formed a lasting relationship. Jayci Gillie/The Collegian
Ronald and Kristin Byrd teach biology on NE Campus. The two met in graduate school and formed a lasting relationship.
Jayci Gillie/The Collegian

campuses. Evidence that Cupid thrives in academic environments can be found in the stories of three TCC couples.

Fuller said the two went to a park, took a walk, had pizza, and Ferguson asked her to be his girlfriend.

Although it is not something she would normally do on the first date, Fuller

said, she agreed because she knew they would be together anyway.

“I know it happened way too fast,” Ferguson said. “But I had to take a shot at it. And she said yes.”

While Cupid takes aim across college campuses, among faculty, the chubby cherub goes underground.

Gregory and Kallie Kosc met at a history club function while at the University of Texas at Arlington. The couple teach on SE where they continue to share their passion for the subject.Alice Hale/The Collegian
Gregory and Kallie Kosc met at a history club function while at the University of Texas at Arlington. The couple teach on SE where they continue to share their passion for the subject.Alice Hale/The Collegian

NE biology professor Kristin Byrd also said yes and in a big way.

Before marrying, she and her husband, Ronald Byrd, who both teach on NE Campus, attended Johns Hopkins University. They were friends for a long time, Ronald Byrd said.

“She even dated other people, and we were still friends,” he said. “She was not in any mood to get serious anytime soon.”

When he first met his future wife, Ronald Byrd said he felt like “this is a person like me.”

“I was attracted to her and felt like it would be a good long-term relationship,” he said. “It would be good.”

He said he thinks his wife appreciated the friendship.

“She grew to trust me,” he said.

Byrd said he knew she was the one for him after he became ill during one break.

“In my time of need, she was the one I wanted to be with,” he said. “I missed her. I missed being around her.”

Kristin Byrd said he did not give up.

“He was persistent,” she said.

She said one good thing about their relationship is they not only teach at the same college but teach in the same subject and can talk about it together at home.

“We totally get it,” she said.

The Byrds have two children, ages 8 and 2. Kristin Byrd said she believes it is important that children hear their parents discussing intellectual matters.

Ronald Byrd said the two were fortunate that neither of them had ever been in a superior position over the other in the workplace.

“In some places, that is illegal,” he said.

Although the Byrds’ work schedules do not usually coincide, they sometimes meet for breakfast or lunch, they said. But, they think being romantic in the workplace is inappropriate.

Ronald Byrd said it would be different if they were at a zoo or somewhere else.

“It is just to be separate,” he said. “A personal life should be separate.”

Other TCC faculty members who are married agree.

SE history instructor Kallie Kosc loves teaching at the same college with her history associate professor husband Greg Kosc, she said. Although they too have differing schedules, they enjoy attending conferences and meetings together.

Kallie Kosc said she and her husband met at the University of Texas at Arlington while at a history club function and developed a friendship.

“Student clubs are an amazing way to not only open up intellectual vistas but also to meet like-minded people and create meaningful and rewarding relationships,” Greg Kosc said. “Perhaps student activities should have a new slogan: Come for the academic rigor, stay for the torrid love affair!”

The Koscs said their love of education and history has bonded them together, but laughter has also been important.

Kallie Kosc said maintaining professionalism at work is always important. And the workplace isn’t exactly conducive to romance.

“While we enjoy chatting at work, we try to hold off on public displays of affection,” Greg Kosc said.

And the good news is Cupid is welcome to fly around TCC. NE police Sgt. Terry Richards said there are no laws or regulations against PDA on campus that he is aware of.

Love is..

“Being able to trust someone implicitly. Having someone on your team always. It’s a good thing to have a partner in life.”

—John Knowles, NW Campus

“I don’t believe in love. I feel like it’s just a temporary feeling. You want to feel it or think you should based on your morals.”

—Hailey Henderson, NW Campus

It’s a bunch of mystical BS someone made up to make themselves feel better.”

—William Arnold, NW Campus

Love is everything. Love is the smile that makes you smile. Love is wanting to make someone laugh just to hear it. Love is knowing someone’s flaws and accepting them for them, not despite them. Love is companionship. Love is forgiveness. Love is very, very hard and so very, very worth it.

—Stephen Heaton, NE Campus

 

“Love is unexplainable, yet very magically and fulfilling feeling. I can’t explain it. You just feel it.”

Lejuana Montford, South Campus

“ It’s a feeling of completion. You aren’t afraid to be yourself, to be goofy around each other.”

—TR Campus, John Gonzales

“Love is having someone who is willing to put up with your faults.”

—Marissa Botello, TR Campus

“Little romantic gestures such as cooking a favorite meal or a random foot massage. Love is unconditional and constant. Love does not judge but is kind in all its ways. I think love is the greatest feeling anyone could have or receive.”

—Kelly Powe, South Campus

The unconditional belief in someone and willingness to make sacrifice to help a person in any way you can.”

 

—J.J. Shofner, TR Campus

“It’s important to have someone you get along with. They should also be someone you can trust and rely on anytime. Too many people are with people because they’re pretty and that’s why it doesn’t last very long.”

—Laura Tafoya, SE Campus

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