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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

NE play offers romantic spontaneity, comedic appeal

By Elyssa Whaley/ne news editor

Hector Cerrato and Brandon Wimmr enjoy their roles as flirtacious characters in the lively play Love's Labour's Lost. Photo by Jayci Gillie/The Collegian
Hector Cerrato and Brandon Wimmr enjoy their roles as flirtacious characters in the lively play Love’s Labour’s Lost.
Photo by Jayci Gillie/The Collegian

Swimsuits and Shakespeare will make for an interesting mix on the set of Love’s Labour’s Lost portrayed as a 1960s Hollywood-style beach film opening next week on NE Campus.

Director Stephen Thomas said he looked at the spirit and witnessed the air and lightness in the play, which led him to use the ’60s beach movie backdrop.

“The quirky frivolity and carefree spirit of the movie got me thinking to portray Shakespeare through this prism,” Thomas said.

In the past, Thomas has changed the setting for many of his productions.

“Stephen always finds these really cool concepts so the audience can relate to it,” Brandon Wimmer, who plays Holofernes, said.

Thomas said he collaborated with the art, English and history departments to put the play together. A live surf band will perform in the production.

The play centers around King Ferdinand and his three loyal lords who have sworn women out of their lives for three years as they pursue scholarly affairs. They almost forget that the Princess of France and her attending ladies are coming to the kingdom, but the king still insists upon their scholarly pursuit.

Irony has its hand, however. The king and his lords meet the princess and her ladies-in-waiting and fall in love.

“I think the play will be a lot of fun,” said Matthew Elkins who plays King Ferdinand. “Stephen is a great director, and there is a lot of action.”

Elkins, performing in his second play, said he had some things in common with his character.

“I fall in love easily, and I like to think I am the king,” he said. “On the other side, though, I think my character is more drawn to rules where I am more go-with-the-flow.”

Elkins hopes the audience will have a good time seeing the production.

“So far, rehearsals have been great,” he said. “Everyone is willing to embrace their characters and open to what they need to do.”

Rox Astemborski, playing the Princess of France, said her character is very cool and calm and is used to getting her way. She said the toughest part is slimming down for the bikinis.

“We’ve all started working out,” she said.

The play is very light-hearted, and Astemborski hopes the audience can relate to the antics and games as the characters develop relationships.

“I’ve worked for Stephen once, and I’ve just kept coming back,” Wimmer said. “I love Shakespeare. It’s what I’m most comfortable with.”

Hector Cerrato, who plays Don Adriano de Armado, said his character is extremely flirtatious, and each day he becomes more and more fun to play.

“Everything will fall into place once I’m in costume,” he said.

He wants the audience to take away one message: “Love conquers all.”

Thomas said that if people can perform Shakespeare, they can perform anything.

“Shakespeare is fun,” he said. “There are no limits to how you can approach the stories. They are timeless.”

The production will run Feb. 27-March 2 in the NFAB NE Playhouse. Performances are 7 p.m. with a 2 p.m. matinee Saturday.

Tickets are free for TCC students, faculty and staff, $3 for non-TCC students and senior citizens and $6 for the general public.

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