By Hannah Lathen/ campus editor

This year’s issue of Script, South’s literary magazine, features pieces from past issues and new selections reflecting its 30th anniversary. 

As part of the celebration at its annual awards night Sept. 23, former contributors and faculty described how Script contributed to their success. Former Script editor-in-chief Bill Holt says he is pleased that the magazine’s legacy carries on.

“They’ve continued with a high quality of artwork,” he said. “It’s very, very impressive. And the fact that students now are doing all the editing and all the competitions, that makes me happy.”

The editorial staff presented awards to the contributors, who are all South students, including top submissions in poetry, fiction, academic essay, visual art and music.

The top submission in poetry went to Jacy Stone for “Mary Tyler Moore Theme Song.” Fiction went to H.E. Riddleton for “Crossover Boy.” Academic essay went to Jocelyn Rodriguez Ramirez for “Blinded War.” Visual art went to Danyelle Casterline for “Dissimilitude, and music went to Rick Spivey for “U Ain’t No Good for Me.”

Student Amanda Fralicks served as both an editor and contributor to this year’s issue of Script and also made the quilt shown on the cover.

“I am ridiculously honored to be a part of it,” she said, “to have people say that my poems were worth printing and to have people believe in me.”

Script has made many changes in its 30 years. The magazine started out only publishing work through contests from Fort Worth ISD and South Campus students. In the 2000s, it started taking open submissions. With the creation of its website, the publication added entries for music. In last year’s issue, Script became a student-edited publication for the first time.

Even with all the changes over the past 30 years, campus academic advisor and Script faculty editor Logen Cure says the core of the magazine has stayed the same.

“It’s about students. It’s for students,” she said. “It’s an incredible opportunity to get some publishing under your belt to go through that process of sending out to editors — to have a platform, to have a voice.”

Every issue of Script can be found at southscript.org.