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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Knowing flu symptoms vital to fight viral season

Knowing+flu+symptoms+vital+to+fight+viral+season

By Katelyn Needham

Students are encouraged to get the flu vaccine and stay home if they are sick. Photo courtesy Blake Patterson
Students are encouraged to get the flu vaccine and stay home if they are sick.
Photo courtesy Blake Patterson

The season of runny noses, coughing and increased tissue sales is just around the corner.

With flu season approaching, health services urges students to be cautious to decrease the spread of germs.

“Primarily, washing hands is the best way to prevent the spread of the flu,” NE registered nurse Tammy Etter said. “Cough into your arm. And if you’re sick, then don’t come to school, stuff like that. If you catch it early enough, you can also go to your doctor and get the anti-viral Tamiflu.”

While the clinics have not seen a spike in flu symptoms just yet, it is important to recognize the difference between a cold and the flu.

“Flu symptoms are much more aggressive than the cold,” Etter said. “The onset is much more sudden. Flu symptoms include fever while cold does not, a worse dry cough, terrible body aches and chest discomfort.”

When it comes to preventative measures, the flu shot and mist are some of the best alternatives available outside of frequent hand washing.

“The flu shot is more effective than the mist,” SE registered nurse Kelly Warren said. “There have been studies done that proved more children, because they are the primary recipients of the mist, who had the mist versus the injection got sick. It is because of those statistics that people are worried it’s less effective.

“So, unfortunately, you’ll have to get stuck.”

NW health services will have set up a table in the coming weeks with cold and flu information for students.

“It’s hard to say when flu season starts exactly,” NW health services coordinator Monica Hayes said. “Sometimes it comes later than others. Last year, it was around November and lasted until March. It just depends on the strain and the year.”

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