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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Etiquette in interview critical, speaker says

By Elaine Bonilla/reporter

Where a nametag is placed on a shirt shows whether the individual has proper business etiquette, a certified business and etiquette consultant told South Campus students last week.

In Professionalism and Business Etiquette: Keys to Intentional Success Oct. 5, Armie Snarley said proper business etiquette is important and can impact whether someone receives a call back for a prospective job.

“The right is the proper side to place your nametag because it is in the line of sight when you’re shaking hands with someone,” she said.

Soft skills such as small talk, tips on making an entrance and proper handshaking techniques were among the key points Snarley addressed in her presentation to the Women in New Roles and Business and Professional Communication students.

“Make sure your right hand is always free and your hand is always firm but not where you’re crushing someone’s hand,” she said. “Both hands connect web-to-web, shake from the elbow and avoid wearing fragrances and large rings.”

When entering the interview room, the applicant should wait for directions and not make assumptions about what to do, Snarley said.

“Wait to be shown a seat,” she said. “Don’t seat yourself.”

Punctuality is another business etiquette requirement, she said.

“If you arrive on time to an interview, you are already late,” she said. “You should always arrive at least 15 minutes early.”

The job interview is the key to a career, Snarley said. If the applicant messes up an interview, there goes that opportunity. With proper etiquette and a great interview, an individual will stand out, Snarley said.

Business major Teresa Henry said she attended the seminar for her class.

“I want to get a better idea of proper business etiquette,” she said.

South Campus student Swanee Arriaga had no idea what the seminar was for but was there because instructor Glo Calhoun had her class attend the seminar. But Arriaga said she benefited from it.

“I learned how something like hair and nails is such a big deal when dressing for an interview,” she said. “I’m going to apply what I learned here to how I dress for an interview.”

 
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