The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Movie Review-Takers

By Joshua Knopp/entertainment editor

Takers isn’t the most original film ever made, but it is remarkably well-executed.

The film features an ensemble cast adept in its portrayal. Matt Dillon, Paul Walker, Idris Elba, Hayden Christensen, Michael Ealy, T.I. Harris and Chris Brown form a group more noted for their musical talents than their acting careers, but they put on a good show.

The plot displays all angles of an armored truck heist. John (Walker), Gordon (Elba), A.J. (Christensen), Jake (Ealy) and Jesse (Brown) are a group of professional robbers fresh from a bank heist. A former member of their group, Ghost (Harris) arrives, suspiciously out of prison a year early, with plans for a $30 million heist that presents a tremendous risk to the group. Meanwhile, a pair of low-level police officers Jack (Dillon) and Eddie (Jay Hernandez) attempt to track them down.

The thing that surprises about the film is how well put together it is. A flashy and rather corny opening act aside, Takers presents what starts out as a run-of-the-mill plot but ends up emotionally complex and ambiguous.

Takers’ ensemble structure succeeds in doing something many films fail to do — bestow upon each character likeable aspects, flaws and emotional identifiability. From Gordon’s addict older sister (Marianne Jean-Baptiste) to the love triangle formed by Jake, Ghost and Rachel (Zoe Saldana) to Jack’s estranged daughter, all of these characters have something to like about them. 

Combine the great character development with the film’s overall ambiguity, a short Tarantino homage at the end and one great gunfight and this movie becomes one of the better crime films in recent memory.

The film isn’t without its bad points. The opening act, while it has a purpose to serve within the plot, is far too fast and doesn’t fit with the rest of the movie. For all the praise that’s been given for its character development, some characters, Rachel and John in particular, fade to the background and could stand more development. The wardrobe is also ridiculous. Who wears a business suit to a Los Angeles hot dog stand?

The movie, while it could have been a bit better, could also have been much, much worse.

 

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