The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Mustache contest raising prostate cancer awareness

By Ciaran Lambert/reporter

This November will also be known as Movember, a men’s health movement raising awareness for prostate cancer by growing out a mustache, otherwise known as a “mo.”

The Movember movement was started over a few beers in Melbourne, Australia, back in 2003. What started as a joke soon became a health movement that raised awareness, money and attention. The funds raised through Movember’s U.S. campaign benefit the Prostate Cancer Foundation and Livestrong, the Lance Armstrong Foundation.

Last year, more than 250,000 men and women came together to raise $40 million, according to the Movember Foundation website.

The rules are simple. Anyone who joins the cause must begin Nov. 1 clean-shaven and spend the next 30 days growing out a mustache. The mustache then becomes the ribbon for men’s health, much like the commitment to the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure.

Ladies can join the effort too by registering, helping to raise money and by showing support to the men in their lives who are growing “mos.”

Anyone involved in Movember is called either a Mo Bro or Mo Sista. Those intending to participate can register as a team captain by starting their own team, a team member by joining a team or as an individual member. Movember will also take donations whether to a team, an individual or men’s health in general. 

The men of Movember are raising awareness for something that gets overlooked at times. Prostate cancer becomes more talked about as a health problem as men get older.

If the cancer metastasizes, it can cause pain while urinating and other health problems. In most cases, the cancer is slow-growing, but one-third of cases show a more aggressive and fast developing form.

While the specific causes of prostate cancer are unknown, doctors have found that certain attributes depict whether males are susceptible. Genetics, diet, medication exposure and viruses are what physicians look at to determine risk.

Prostate cancer accounts for about 11 percent of total cancer deaths in the U.S.

Some TCC students, who wish to remain anonymous, have been debating whether or not to grow a “Rhett Butler,” a “Tom Selleck” or an “Aldo Raine.”

“My dad was a Magnum P.I. fan, and so I might grow out a Selleck,” said one student.

For more information on Movember, go to us.movemberfoundation.com. For more information on prostate cancer, go to pcf.org.

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