The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Jerry’s stadium wants your cash

Viewpoint by Ashley Bradley/ne news editor

In 2004, 55.2 percent of Arlington voters approved the new Cowboys stadium. This does not seem an overwhelming approval rate for a $1.15 billion structure.

A year later, the first of many houses, apartment buildings, businesses and trees was demolished to make way for the oversized building where men can play football, and people can watch them.

I don’t get it. I don’t understand why a team of adult football stars needs a stadium taller than the Statue of Liberty to play in.

The stadium includes a retractable roof that can open and close in 12 minutes, 600 tons of video boards and massive sliding glass doors.

“It has to do with the economic times and what I anticipate with the future. These stadiums are going to be more of a challenge to build financially,” Cowboys owner Jerry Jones told the Star-Telegram.

Jones put a major investment into this stadium, but charging Cowboy fans their entire life savings is not the way to recoup his money.

Fans interested in attending a game should be prepared to diminish the size of their wallet. The most expensive seat in the house will cost $340 with a $150,000 personal seat license. These seats include free food and drinks, VIP parking and a chance to buy tickets to all other events at the stadium including concerts and the 2011 Super Bowl. Good luck.

The cheapest seats in the stadium will run $75 with no personal seat license required. These seats give an eagle’s view. The players look like ants, but at least ticket holders can see the huge TV screen. It’s probably bigger than the average home. Parking will cost $50 to $75 depending on how far the fan feels like walking. Once inside the stadium, hungry fans will pay a whopping $14 for a dry, aged-beef sandwich while a draft beer will run $9.

“It’s truly iconic. People, literally from all over the world, will want to come and see it, whether they know what to do on a fourth-and-long or not,” said associate principal architect of Dallas Mark Williams in the Star-Telegram.

It’s a sight to see because of its size, but once the rest of the world comes to see it, they will turn back around laughing at what it cost.

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