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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

RadioShack, TCC learning to share space

Trinity River students David Puga and Telee Pruitt ascend the escalator near RadioShack’s offices. Trinity River students and RadioShack employees “seem to mingle well,” according to a RadioShack contractor.  Photo by Brian Koenig/The Collegian
Trinity River students David Puga and Telee Pruitt ascend the escalator near RadioShack’s offices. Trinity River students and RadioShack employees “seem to mingle well,” according to a RadioShack contractor. Photo by Brian Koenig/The Collegian

By Shelly Williams/managing editor

Trinity River students David Puga and Telee Pruitt ascend the escalator near RadioShack’s offices. Trinity River students and RadioShack employees “seem to mingle well,” according to a RadioShack contractor.  Photo by Brian Koenig/The Collegian
Trinity River students David Puga and Telee Pruitt ascend the escalator near RadioShack’s offices. Trinity River students and RadioShack employees “seem to mingle well,” according to a RadioShack contractor. Photo by Brian Koenig/The Collegian

Hollow hallways are now filled with not one, but two different sets of feet since the opening of Trinity River Campus in August.

Students, faculty and staff share the walkways and cafeteria of the new campus with RadioShack employees. Once RadioShack’s headquarters, the building was bought by TCC in 2008.

Since the two have merged, RadioShack and TR students say they haven’t had any complications of the two meshing so far.

“I don’t see them [RadioShack employees] very much,” TR student Marie Wilhelm said.

RadioShack employees aren’t invisible to TR student Abby Jackson. She said she runs into employees in the parking garage floors on her way to class but thinks things will continue to run smoothly throughout the year.

“I don’t think there is going to be much of a problem. It doesn’t seem like there is one now,” Jackson said.

“They pretty much stay on their little group. They go on and do what they’ve got to do, and we do what we have to do.”

Though TR students haven’t heard much bustle out of RadioShack employees, the technology company said it has experienced an interesting buzz around the building since the campus joined into the complex.

“It’s exciting to experience their energy levels,” said Wendy Dominguez, corporate media relations manager of RadioShack. 

“All of us hope that the students, faculty and staff are enjoying the campus facilities and surroundings as much as we have in recent years. It’s a great place to call home away from home.”

Jeff Pohlmann, a contractor for RadioShack, saw the building transform and said the building is more appropriate for a community college than most businesses and the combination of the two will continue to go well.

“I think that the organization here is a mature organization, so I doubt that there is anything that would cause a discourse between the two organizations. They seem to mingle well,” Pohlmann said.

For one RadioShack employee, the transition has been more like musical chairs. Though Gloria Machuca said she has shared seats during her lunch break because of the crowded cafeteria, she said the students have made the building feel much less abandoned since the change.

“It’s pleasant. It’s nice to have other people besides just us here,” she said. “It’s fun. I like it. You see every walks of life. It’s fun to dialogue with them. It’s better now than having most of it empty. It’s not a ghost town anymore.”

RadioShack will remain in the Clear Fork Building of TR Campus until 2011 and the West Fork Building until 2013.

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