The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Boxing: No class, no heroes since Ali

Viewpoint by Marley Malenfant/se news editor

The sport of boxing used to have beloved heroes, something the sport desperately needs today.

The idea that the sport is on its last leg isn’t far-fetched. The sport doesn’t have the same class of fighters it once boasted. Muhammad Ali was once the face of boxing and is still respected by many boxing fans and non-boxing fans today.

Floyd Mayweather Jr., on the other hand, could be the face for when boxing falls in a pit. Mayweather is considered pound-for–pound one of the best boxers today with a record of 40-0.

It can also be argued that Mayweather is one of the most boring fighters today.

“He fights in the ring like he’s scared,” longtime promoter Bob Arum told ESPN The Magazine. “He’s not entertaining, and that’s not what fans want.”

Mayweather has been known for choosing opponents that cater to him. In his most recent fight, Juan Marquez, had to move up two weight classes just to meet up with Mayweather.

Mayweather’s antics inside the ring hurt the sport. His behavior outside will kill it.

Like so many other African-American athletes who play the race card, Mayweather says, “If I was white, I would be the biggest athlete in America.” 

He carries the nickname money and shows off his fortune like a buffoon on his HBO reality show. He goes around clubs making it rain by throwing thousands of dollars in the air.

He then takes a jab at boxing trainer Emanuel Steward, calling him an “Uncle Tom” when Steward has done nothing but help African-American boxers get their start in the ring and a chance at life.

Ali was a showman inside and outside the ring. He was confident and at times cocky. But, overall, he was a hero. He never backed down from anyone in the ring and has been the same way throughout his life.

Mayweather is arrogant and just hurting himself and his peers. If he could recognize that instead of his wallet, he could save boxing and himself.

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