The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

SE Campus starts new year off right

   A traditional dancing Chinese dragon stole the show as it interacted with audience members and participants at last week’s celebration of the Chinese New Year on SE Campus.
   Sponsored by student activities, the event in the North Ballroom featured the J.K. Wong Academy performing the traditional lion dance, Chinese-Hawaiian dancing and traditional music and food.
   The celebration gave participants a look at the traditions of the Chinese New Year and introduced the meaning of the event to students and visitors.
   Chinese New Year starts on the first day of the new year and ends on the full moon 15 days later.
   On the final day, the Lantern Festival is celebrated at night with children carrying lanterns in a parade.
   The celebration is based on the Chinese calendar with 2006 as the Year of the Dog. New Year’s Eve and Day are a time of reunion with family and friends.
   A religious ceremony honors Heaven and Earth, the gods of the household and family ancestors.
   During the 15 days of celebration a sacrifice is made to ancestors.
   Departed family members are given respect for laying the foundation of their families.
   The spirits of the ancestors begin the year with the traditional feast called “surrounding the stove” or weilu, which symbolizes unity and honors past and present generations.
   Toward the end of the 15 days, friends and relatives are invited for dinner.
   Vast amounts of traditional food are prepared for family and friends. Foods play a significant role in the celebration.
   Lotus seed signifies having many male offspring; ginko nut represents silver ingots; black moss represents exceeding wealth; dried bean curd is another homonym for fulfillment of wealth and happiness; bamboo shoots are used to wish that everything will be well.
   Fresh bean curd or tofu is not included for it is white and considered unlucky because it signifies death and misfortune.

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