The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

SE play to highlight community-building, respect

By Mathew Shaw/se news editor

Carlos Rosales/The Collegian  SE students rehearse for the upcoming production of Godspell, a modern-day musical adaptation of the Gospel of St. Matthew. The show revolves around Jesus Christ and his disciples helping tell his biblical parables.
Carlos Rosales/The Collegian SE students rehearse for the upcoming production of Godspell, a modern-day musical adaptation of the Gospel of St. Matthew. The show revolves around Jesus Christ and his disciples helping tell his biblical parables.

The gospel will leap from the pages of the Bible and onto the stage with the SE drama program’s musical production Godspell set to run April 23-26.

Written by Stephen Schwartz, Godspell is based on the Gospel of St. Matthew. It tells the story of a group of people who help Jesus Christ tell parables by using music, comedy and games.

SE student Felicia Ajibike will perform in the play as herself.

“Other than Judas and Jesus, there aren’t really any set character names,” she said. “So I am Felicia in the show.”

Marisa Cason, who will perform as a pig and a sheep in the parables, said all the actors will be on stage throughout the show.

“Everyone is in every parable, every scene, everything we do,” she said. “This is a very high-energy production.”

Sarah Ford plays one of the disciples.

“Honestly, Godspell is the hardest musical to explain to someone!” she said.

To illustrate the confusion she felt when first reading the script, Ford recalled reading lines that said, “There once was a king … yeah, yeah!” She did not realize this was supposed to be a rap verse at first.

“It’s set in the urban playground,” she said. “It is the Book of Matthew if it were to happen in the modern age.”

Some of the cast members said the musical was like a fun church service.

Cason said the lessons in the play are universal.

“The main theme is a community,” she said. “We’re not ‘fire and brimstone.’ We’re ‘love thy neighbor.’ It’s teaching mutual respect and overall love.”

The roles of John the Baptist and Judas will both be played by the same actor, Ryan Chapman. After John the Baptist baptizes Jesus, Chapman then changes character into Judas.

“For the audience to see the same person baptize him and then betray him sends a more powerful message,” he said.

Pert Durapau, the play’s director, said since John the Baptist’s scene is so short, the playwright chose to have the same actor portray Judas as well.

“When this play was originally produced, it was with the idea of it being an ensemble piece,” she said. “If one actor played John the Baptist, that actor would be gone from the ensemble.”

Raymond Ruffin, who will play Jesus Christ in the flesh, said he feels a bit of pressure playing the role “because, well, it’s Jesus!”

Explaining the layout of the play, Ruffin said the first act is mostly centered around community-building. The second act follows “Passion of the Christ.” After the crucifixion, the disciples are then ready to spread Jesus’ message.

Ruffin said the community-building in the play mirrored the cast becoming closer as well.

“Now, we’re a big family,” he said. “We love each other so much.”

The musical will be performed at 7:30 p.m. April 23-26 with a 1:30 p.m. matinee April 25. General admission will be $6, $3 for non-TCC students and senior citizens and free for TCC students, faculty and staff. To make reservations, call 817-515-3599.

Donate to The Collegian

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tarrant County College. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Collegian