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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Movie Review-Darjeeling Limited

Adrien Brody, Owen Wilson and Jason Schwartzman play brothers who deal with each other on a spiritual journey following their father’s death in the quirky film, Darjeeling Limited, showing in limited theaters in the metroplex area.  Photo courtesy Fox Searchlight
Adrien Brody, Owen Wilson and Jason Schwartzman play brothers who deal with each other on a spiritual journey following their father’s death in the quirky film, Darjeeling Limited, showing in limited theaters in the metroplex area. Photo courtesy Fox Searchlight

By Sara Pintilie/entertainment editor

Adrien Brody, Owen Wilson and Jason Schwartzman play brothers who deal with each other on a spiritual journey following their father’s death in the quirky film, Darjeeling Limited, showing in limited theaters in the metroplex area.  Photo courtesy Fox Searchlight
Adrien Brody, Owen Wilson and Jason Schwartzman play brothers who deal with each other on a spiritual journey following their father’s death in the quirky film, Darjeeling Limited, showing in limited theaters in the metroplex area. Photo courtesy Fox Searchlight

The latest notch in Wes Anderson’s (Rushmore) belt, The Darjeeling Limited is an offbeat, dry film but charming in its quirks.

Francis (Zoolander’s Owen Wilson) ropes his two brothers, Jack (Shopgirl’s Jason Schwartzman) and Peter (The Pianist’s Adrien Brody), into a trip across India a year after their father’s death.

On their train, the Darjeeling Limited, they try to deal with each other’s unusual traits while trying to have a spiritual journey.

Jack is still hung on his ex. He even checks her personal messages occasionally.

Francis, the eldest, still bosses around his siblings and confiscates their passports, not to mention the very noticeable amount of gauze strapped around his wounded face.

Peter has a penchant to steal things, mainly his dad’s trinkets like his razor and prescription sunglasses.

During their trip, they manage to get kicked off the train (something about a poisonous snake and mace) in the middle of Indian terrain with only a laminating machine, printer and collection of matching luggage.

Anderson’s reality is usually filled with an oddball immaturity and bizarre premises (remember Steve Zissou?).

But this movie is stripped of all of that nonsense and left with three juveniles passing off as adults.

The Darjeeling Limited is a simple tale. No frills or special effects, just a gorgeous Indian backdrop and three talented actors.

Though some might not get Anderson’s vision or sense of humor, this film is delightfully quirky and grows on the audience.

The more the viewers reflect on this movie, the more it makes them smile.

The trio prevails as dysfunctional brothers, and the audience can even feel the awkwardness among them.

Brody is the newest arrival to the Ander-son’s clan and fits in wonder-fully.

The best thing about the three brothers, Wilson, Brody and Schwartzman, is they balance out each other.

If one ventures too far into unrealistically crazy, the other two drag him back to reality.

Two Anderson alums briefly show up: Bill Murray (Rushmore) and Anjelica Huston (The Royal Tenenbaums).

The problem one might see with the film is the lack of a very visible point to the film.

There is one, but many moviegoers won’t bother to find it.

To them it might just seem like three guys wandering around India.

Also a short film, Hotel Chevalier, is shown before the film.

This short is about 13 minutes, but it follows Jack before his trip to India. His girlfriend (V for Vendetta’s Natalie Portman) comes over for a last hurrah or something of the sorts.

It is just a snapshot but an entertaining one.

Hotel Chevalier and The Darjeeling Limited are simple but sweet stories and worth the admission.

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