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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Fury flick paints honest picture of brutality in war

By Rodrigo Valverde/reporter

Set during World War II in April 1945, Fury gives viewers a solid, gripping and effective story about war that is brutal but honest as well.

David Ayer, who directed the critically acclaimed End of Watch and most recently Sabotage, directs the film.

Fury takes place over the course of one day during the last month on the European front and begins with an army of tank soldiers returning to base after battle.

The crew that the film focuses on is led by Brad Pitt’s character Wardaddy who commands the Sherman tank called “Fury” and its five veteran soldiers.

The men return from battle having lost an assistant driver. They replace him with a recently enlisted typist, Norman, played by Logan Lerman, who’s only been in the Army for eight weeks and has never seen time on the battlefield or even the inside of a tank.

Wardaddy (Brad Pitt) sits atop “Fury” with his team of veterans. Photo courtesy Columbia Pictures
Wardaddy (Brad Pitt) sits atop “Fury” with his team of veterans. Photo courtesy Columbia Pictures

The crew quickly has to adjust to having a new soldier in its group and make sure that his mistakes don’t get them all killed.

One thing Fury excels in is displaying the brutality of war without glorifying it. For the soldiers, it was never about showing everyone how tough and manly they were and how over-the-top they could kill a Nazi.

The soldiers clearly aren’t enjoying what they’re doing. The audience can tell that they don’t want to have to be out there killing anyone, and that is due to the amazing performances the actors give.

Of the five main crewmembers, Norman is the focus, and Lerman’s performance is the best of his career.

Pitt shows viewers why he is one of the most sought-after actors in Hollywood. He may be able to sneak onto the Oscar ballot with a Best Actor nomination with his commanding performance.

Michael Pena, who previously worked with Ayer in End of Watch, and Jon Bernthal from Walking Dead fame both do superior work in their supporting roles.

And though he doesn’t have the most screen time, Shia LeBeouf surprisingly stands out simply because viewers aren’t used to seeing him in these types of roles — he delivers.

Everyone in the crew contributes to the film and the story.

Besides the direction and exceptional acting, the action sequences and special effects are worth the price of admission. The tank battle scenes are well-choreographed and extremely entertaining. The cinematography and sound design also put viewers right in the middle of the action and make them feel as if they’re in World War II.

This is by no means a perfect film, though. There are some pacing issues, there isn’t much backstory to any of the characters and there are some predictable moments throughout, including the final act. But those flaws can easily be overlooked with the good far outweighing the bad.

With the recent announcement that Ayer will be directing the upcoming DC superhero film Suicide Squad, comic book film fans should definitely look into this film to see what he can bring to the table.

Fury is playing in theaters everywhere and is a solid recommendation.

It is an honest, action-packed, well-presented film that will not disappoint. This is one of the best war films in recent memory.

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