The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Texas requires voters show ID

By Jamil Oakford/se news editor

Texans will need more than just a voting card at the polls to vote in next week’s gubernatorial election.

As early voting continues on TCC campuses until Oct. 30 and precincts open for Election Day Nov. 4, people are required to bring a federal-issued form of identification instead of needing only a voter registration card.

This, of course, includes state ID, driver’s license, passport and military ID but excludes easily obtainable identification such as school or employee ID. A concealed handgun license is also acceptable.

Voter ID laws have been cropping up systematically over the last three to four years, especially among the southern and midwestern states. This has led to opponents criticizing it for being too restrictive and a way to keep many people from voting.

Supporters say that this law specifically targets in-person voter fraud and argue that such a law disenfranchises no one.

South student Chase Buchan explained he knew the basics about the law.

“We have been talking about it my government class,” he said.

He believes it will affect some people but not him since he has the proper identification.

Meanwhile, SE student Margrett Hallman held a different view. Personally, it didn’t affect her, but she knew someone that it would affect.

“I’m not a big fan of it,” Hallman said. “In theory, everyone should, but my grandma has an invalid one, no car and no way to get to a DMV unless I take her.”

She went on to explain that some people might live 50 miles away from the nearest Department of Motor Vehicles and that would put them at a disadvantage.

The Texas Tribune cited 500,000 people who were registered to vote in the state of Texas and did not have proper identification.

A group had appealed and a U.S. District Judge struck it down. The law was revoked in both Texas and Wisconsin, but the U.S. Supreme Court deemed it was too close to the November election and reinstated it.

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