The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Free screenings, tests made available on NE

X-rays won’t be available, but the NE health fair Oct. 7 will have other screenings.Sacramento Bee/MCT
X-rays won’t be available, but the NE health fair Oct. 7 will have other screenings.

Sacramento Bee/MCT

By Brandy Voirin/ reporter

Free resources and lots of them are part of the top reasons students should attend the NE Campus health fair, according to NE health services coordinator Pat Marling.

The health fair runs 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 7 in the Darlage Center Corner (NSTU 1615A).

X-rays won’t be available, but the NE health fair Oct. 7 will have other screenings.Sacramento Bee/MCT
X-rays won’t be available, but the NE health fair Oct. 7 will have other screenings.
Sacramento Bee/MCT

Although health screenings are considered “teachable moments” that could cultivate change, Marling said most students aren’t taking advantage of all the options available.

NE health service administrative assistant Bernie Yee and Marling are offering a list of reasons why students should participate this year.

“There’s always a line outside the door for the HIV and syphilis testing,” Yee said. “Now, I applaud the younger students for their efforts, but there are so many more valuable screenings and resources offered on that day, and most services are free.”

New this year to the health fair is Pregnancy Help4 U, which will test and treat male and females with sexually transmitted infections.

“Most students are able to get tested for this disease but have no options for treatment,” she said. “This year, we are happy to have found an agency that helps students with both.”

New services aren’t the only resource the fair has to offer. Students may also check out health-related library books during the health fair in lieu of going to the library.

“This fair is like a one-stop checkup that really counts, especially for students looking to save money and get answers to health-related questions,” Marling said. “You can’t beat the resources the health fair will offer, from clothing assistance, vision and hearing screenings. And for students in need, a representative from the Affordable Care Act will be on hand to allow students to get insured.”

The savings to students really can add up.

Workers pay an average of $1,318 out of pocket before health insurance coverage starts to cover part of their bills, up from $584 a decade ago, according to a new report from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

For students, that’s a lot of money.

“It is so vital for students to take advantage of these free and, in many cases, life-saving health screenings,” she said, “because this is the one time of the year where all these vendors will be in one place.”

Health organizations include the American Cancer Society, Baylor Regional Medical Center, Cook Children’s Health Plan and the Tarrant County Public Health department.

“All vendors have something special to offer,” she said. “For example, Baylor will offer free blood pressure and cholesterol screening. The kinesiology department will be offering body fat index testing and fitness tests, too.”

TCC-affiliated services at the fair include the dental hygiene program, kinesiology to measure body fat and grip strength, health sciences and the TCC police to discuss personal safety.

Every day, close to 800 patients in North, Central and East Texas require timely blood transfusions, according to the Carter BloodCare website. And blood is the one resource that can only come from a volunteer.

Carter BloodCare will have two locations available: a walk-up mobile unit and another in the Galley (NSTU 1506) until 4 p.m. for blood donations. Students may sign up online for an appointment or walk in one of the blood drive locations.

Anyone can register to donate bone marrow as well at the fair.

Some professors are offering extra credit for students who attend the health fair. Marling encourages students to stop by the health office to see if their professor is offering extra credit.

“At the end of the day, there are more reasons to attend the health fair than not to attend the health fair,” she said. “But most importantly, we have not worked so hard on the health fair for us, but for the students. Many former students’ lives have been saved because of vital information they discovered at the health fair.”

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