The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

South tells plastic surgeon’s tale

By Samuel Medina III /south news editor

An unusual, satirical play about a medieval plastic surgeon and the outrageous body modifications he performs is coming to the Joe B. Rushing Center for the Performing Arts on South Campus.

Jimmy Lunch plays a character who gets drunk before performing plastic surgery on a corpse while James Bonar mentors him on the procedure in South’s play Nov. 19-21. Rick McNeely/The Collegian
Jimmy Lunch plays a character who gets drunk before performing plastic surgery on a corpse while James Bonar mentors him on the procedure in South’s play Nov. 19-21.
Rick McNeely/The Collegian

South Campus’ drama program will perform the bizarre, off-the-wall play Nosemaker’s Apprentice: Chronicles of a Medieval Plastic Surgeon Nov. 19-21.

Written by Nick Jones and Rachel Shukert, the play concerns a drunken father telling his daughter a story about a young orphan who becomes one of Vienna’s greatest nosemakers, or plastic surgeons, but gets into trouble when he and his master can’t help a mutilated knight.

South student James Bonar, who plays the Viennese nosemaker Ulrich, said the play is absolutely crazy.

“It’s a comedy play,” he said. “It’s cheesy, but it’s fun.”

Bonar said the whole play is meant to be ridiculous with all of the twisted plastic surgery and it’s all-over-the-place action.

“I use a comically bad German accent because it’s all meant to be ridiculous,” he said. “This play is like if South Park and Monty Python had a baby.”

South student Scott Wild said the odd nature of the play is great.

“I narrate the play as the drunken father,” he said. “As the father drinks, the play gets more ridiculous as a result.”

Wild said they are making the play appropriate enough for families to bring younger ones and that imagination will be needed when watching the show.

“We do use some atmosphere in the play, but it’s not full fledged, so imagination will come into play,” he said.

The play requires most of the actors to play more than one role, even as many as three.

The students and director have been working on the play for a month, and they say they feel confident about their upcoming performances.

Drama adjunct instructor Richard Haratine said the play has been fun and challenging.

“It’s wild and a bit of a satire,” he said. “It addresses the issue of physical alteration, or plastic surgery, and what that means. Is it good? Is it bad? It’s about the big question, why alter your appearance? It’s all done in a bizarre, playful and medieval land.”

Haratine said even though the play is an odd one, they hope the audience still manages to connect with them and the unique humor.

“It’s just a matter of finding out what’s funny and what’s not funny,” he said. “Sometimes a powerful way to engage in a real political, social, economic or religious conversation is to come at it from the angle of humor.”

Haratine said all of the actors have all been doing a really good job at taking direction, knowing what the play is about and working together.

“They work together very well,” he said. “One of the reasons I love working here at TCC South Campus is because a lot of students that come here are very interested and comfortable with the sense of collaboration.”

He said he rarely, if ever, runs into any real strong conflict on South Campus.

“Usually when I’m working with the students here, there is a very strong sense of family, support and community,” he said.

Haratine said he tries to create an environment where people can express themselves and grow.

“It’s a safe environment,” he said. “There is not a lot of animosity that develops, which I think is because the theater itself is a wonderful environment for people to get to know each other.”

He said nobody minds being silly because everyone in the theater is just having a good time.

“The thing I love the most is just getting together with a group of people and working on plays,” he said. “It’s a strong sense of community and family, even though none of us are family.”

The show is free for TCC students, faculty and staff, $3 for non-TCC students and senior citizens and $6 for the public. Tickets go on sale at the box office the night of performance. Shows begin at 7:30 p.m. There is no late seating.

For more information, contact drama instructor Lindy Benton at 817-515-4717.

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