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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Transfer event aids NE students with money

Texas Wesleyan was among 11 universities present to help with the transfer event Nov. 3.Collegian file photo
Texas Wesleyan was among 11 universities present to help with the transfer event Nov. 3.

Collegian file photo

By Katherine Barclay/ reporter

NE students learned Nov. 3 they should apply early for transfer money.

Texas Wesleyan was among 11 universities present to help with the transfer event Nov. 3.Collegian file photo
Texas Wesleyan was among 11 universities present to help with the transfer event Nov. 3.
Collegian file photo

Eleven Texas universities gathered on campus to tell students about financial options during the Transfer Academy series session, Getting Interactive.

Representatives from Texas Christian University, the University of Texas at Arlington, Texas Wesleyan University, Southern Methodist University, Dallas Baptist University, the University of North Texas, the University of North Texas at Dallas, Texas A&M University, the University of Texas at Dallas, Texas Tech University and Tarleton State University answered questions from students.

Four of the schools are private institutions. Recruiters noted that although private school tuition is higher than that of public schools, private institutions can offer a large amount of scholarship money. SMU recruiter Jen Lasagna said the cost of SMU should not discourage students from applying.

“If money is the reason you are not looking at SMU, please stop,” she said. “We do offer a plethora of options for you.”

Most universities offer merit-based scholarships for transfers. Texas Wesleyan offers transfers several options. Students with a 2.5 GPA or above are eligible for at least $4,000 in scholarships. Many schools offer scholarships for members of Phi Theta Kappa.

UNT Dallas offers up to $4,000 in PTK scholarships while SMU has half and full scholarships available for members.

Vanessa Ximenez, NE transfer center coordinator, said many students visit her office hoping to transfer in the spring. Financial aid deadlines are sooner than the actual application, and scholarships and financial aid are limited in the spring, she said.

UNT Dallas recruiter Michelle Hurdle said students should apply early for financial aid and scholarships because they are on a first-come, first-served basis.

“Think of financial aid as a pitcher of water — once you pour that out, there is no financial aid money refill,” Hurdle said. “Once it’s gone, it’s gone.”

Ximenez said that once students realize financial aid deadlines have passed or that scholarships are no longer available, they often decide to hold off on transferring until the fall. Students with high GPAs should strongly consider waiting until the fall because they are likely to receive more scholarship money, she said.

Texas Tech recruiter Zinab Munoz attended specifically to recruit education majors for the TechTeach program, a one-year teacher preparation program where students can become teachers in their local communities. All coursework is completed online through Texas Tech, but student teaching is done in area school districts.

Fort Worth Independent School District is one of several locations where the program is offered. Once students complete the program, they are guaranteed a job in the school district, Munoz said.

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