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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Students discuss financial future

Suzann Clay/The Collegian
Suzann Clay/The Collegian

By Lindsay Norman/ reporter

Many TCC students, like Reed Sherman, have financial concerns with today’s economy.

Suzann Clay/The Collegian
Suzann Clay/The Collegian

Sherman is working on his major in finance/accounting and a minor in economics on NE Campus. He has his own theory on what he would like to see change if he had the power.

“I suppose if I could change anything in particular, I would set a flat tax rate so that regardless of your income level, you pay the same percentage in taxes,” he said. “That being said, I would also cut down on tax breaks to big corporations … and attempt to stop the wealthy upper class from hiding their money overseas to avoid paying taxes.”

Sherman, 20, works full time and attends school full time. He lives with his parents and pays for all of his expenses but says if he were to live on his own, he would struggle financially, and saving money would be out of the question.

“I do not make enough money to cover my expenses and still cannot save much money,” he said. “So if it were my career not just a job … I would have to work until I was 70 or 80 years old to retire.”

Although he saves, he worries he doesn’t have as much as experts suggest.

“I do have a savings account, but I do not believe it would be enough to support me through six months of unemployment,” he said.

NE student Taylor White also voices concern about today’s financial problems. White is going to school to major in business management and automotive technology. While living on his own and attending school full time, he works evenings to provide for himself and his child.

“Most companies make you work for about six months to a year with no benefits when you first come on,” he said.

This millennial generation is struggling to find jobs considered full time.

“Although I work full-time hours, … I do not get benefits because my position title is technically part time,” he said.

On the flip side, students have found a few ways to cut back on their spending.

“The biggest thing I realized was buying lunch and dinner on my break at work … bringing food from home has saved me from spending $8-$12 every day at work,” Sherman said.

White has similar techniques for saving.

“I usually eat over with family to save money on food,” he said. “Also, most of our clothes and my son’s toys are hand downs from friends with kids.”

For what to expect in the future, one student had a more cynical view for where he sees himself in the next five years.

NE student Will Cortez says he will be graduated, in debt and looking for a job.

However, another student doesn’t let the outside world crush his ambition. A full-time student, Eric Steffey has set goals and does not let his financial means become an issue.

“I was tired of being stagnant, and I wanted to share with my generation that we can be the change. We are the change. …,” he said. “We have time to create our own destiny. … I cannot take the material things with me when my time on Earth is expired.”

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