The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Sisters Bridging Cultures: One Voice, One Heart, Many Hands

Left: Universal Heart Triptch, Barbara Mulley
Andy Bonilla/The Collegian

The art of women who are students, authors and designers as well as professionals who use art as a hobby or self-expression fill the Carillon Gallery on South Campus.

Women in New Roles kicked off its 33rd anniversary with a WINR Art Show reception Feb. 21. The theme — Sisters Bridging Cultures: One Voice, One Heart, Many Hands — is displayed through the art exhibit.

Lynda Effertz, psychotherapist and founder of the annual WINR Art Show, has a terra cotta piece, “The Contemplation,” on display. The work is a woman’s head and shoulders, hair having the blown-in-the-wind look, eyes set as in deep thought. Effertz described the inspiration behind the piece as “going to that space.”

Effertz and Barbara Jones share a wall for their artwork, which is fitting since the two travel together taking art classes in their spare time. They both work with oil and paint, wax, water on Yupo paper as well as traditional clay for sculpting. Jones’ work includes framed art using encaustic, an art form that uses wax.

Teronna Bowden, a substitute teacher for Fort Worth ISD, showcases pictures from her children’s book. As a teacher, Bowden said she witnesses bullying of different levels. One picture shows two boys bullying another boy while the bullied boy’s friend looks on.

“That happens many times,” she said. “Kids’ friends are afraid to help them.” Following the unexpected death of her mother, Bowden said she put her pen and paper down but later found peace and strength in her love for writing and drawing. “Never give up on you,” she said, offering advice to other women. “God has a gift for everyone.”

Maria Carter‘s frames of all sorts and sizes grace the north wall of the room. She didn’t hesitate to say her inspiration was by “God and only God.” Her framed art consists of different fabrics, styles, colors, thicknesses and quilt pieces.

Carter said each design represents the many families that exist in today’s time. During the reception, Carter challenged viewers to pick out which framed fabric represents her. After neither chose the correct frame after a couple of guesses, she pointed to a blank piece of wool fabric.“That one,” she said. “That’s me.”

Carter said the blank canvas depicts her as a work in progress. God isn’t finished with her yet, she said.

Staying within the Sisters Bridging Cultures theme, among the meticulously arranged frames is “A Unique Design Created by God,” a framed passage Carter wrote describing women.

“Women are the fabric of society,” it reads. ”Mothers, daughters, sisters and wives are the makeup of generations. A unique design created by God. The objective is to symbolize the essential experiences that characterize women through fabric. There is striking resemblance in the life of a woman.” The art is displayed 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Thursday until March 3.

– Angel Carr

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