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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Unknown unoriginal, uneven

By Frankie Farrar-Helm/entertainment editor

Way to keep it original.

People expecting another heart-pounding Liam Neeson action film will be snoring through his newest film, Unknown.

The film opens with Dr. Martin Harris (Liam Neeson) and his wife, Liz (January Jones), on a plane to Berlin for Harris’ presentation at a biotechnology conference. When the couple checks in at their hotel, Harris realizes he left his briefcase, which contains his identification, at the airport and abruptly leaves the hotel. On the way to the airport, he and his taxi driver, Gina (Diane Kruger), are in an accident and fly off a bridge, crashing into the river. Gina saves his life and disappears from the scene.

Four days later, Harris wakes up in a hospital where he is told he has been in a coma. When he finds Liz back at the hotel, she doesn’t recognize him and calls her husband over who also claims to be Dr. Martin Harris. Confused, Harris panics and gets thrown out of the hotel by security. He then finds Gina, and they embark together on a dangerous, action-packed chase for his identification and to understand the conspiracy that Harris believes is being plotted against him.

The plot is interesting but not original. This is not the first film made about identity theft, nor is it the first to be conspiracy-related.

What’s worse is the irritating delay in action. About 45 minutes into the film, it finally begins to suck in the viewer. The last half of the film incorporates high-speed chases, man-to-man fistfights and buildings blowing up, which are exciting but would be appreciated more if they weren’t crammed into the end.

Many unexpected twists baffle the viewer longer than desired. Confusion, for the most part, is predictable and accepted in a suspense thriller but not when the viewer leaves the movie asking questions.

Aside from the over-exaggerated introduction, one could argue that the amount of confusion in the film is its major flaw.

Neeson’s role in Unknown, although well-played, is nothing different than his usual dynamic character. Unfortunately, the film could best be described as an unsatisfying sequel of Neeson’s latest major film, Taken.

Kruger, who plays an illegal citizen from Bosnia who works odd jobs to earn her way out of the country, is excellent.

Jones appears gorgeous and flawless in the film. Sadly, her acting is not.

The film also includes Aidan Quinn (Dr. Martin Harris’ imposter), Frank Langella (Rodney Cole) and Bruno Ganz (Jurgen).

Overall, the film was mediocre. For moviegoers who settle for mediocrity, Unknown is a good choice.

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