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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

R&B music revived by heartfelt lyrics, funky production

Some Day This All Will Make Sense, BOSCO. In her sophomore project, BOSCO narrates a story of growth and realization and how the stories will all connect in the end.
April 8, 2020 | Michael Foster-Sanders | feature editor

 

R&B music is in such bad shape right now.

From the toxic femininity that Jhené Aiko albums reek of, and the forced campy love songs of Ella Mai or Summer Walker. BOSCO, with her sophomore album “Some Day This All Will Make Sense,” feels as refreshing as surprise rain on a hot summer day.

BOSCO’s debut album in 2017 dealt with a young woman coming into her own dealing with the world, relationships and heartbreak. It felt heavy with its rollercoaster of emotions. So with this evolution, she embarks on being carefree and having fun over sultry grooves with funky bridges.

The album starts with the track “Champagne,” and it’s going to be a summertime all-white rooftop party slapper.

With its light pop mood-inducing melody that’s just vibing and having fun, it will make butts get on the dancefloor to cut a rug or two.

“Attention” is about a woman who craves affection from her boyfriend and is trying to figure out a way to let him know without seeming overbearing or abrasive.

A relatable track for anyone who’s been in love and yearns for more devotion from a partner.

The free spirit mood picks back up on the de facto jam “Take Off” which starts with a simple but funky drum pattern, then eases in a distorted electric guitar.

It’s topped off like a cherry on a sundae with psychedelic keys to create a score that memories should be made to.

The lyrics to the hook are, “We can get away/Dancing in the dark/We forever like the stars/Even if we don’t go far.”

BOSCO plays with her voice, going from singing in her alto vocals to talking in a baritone, which enhances the vibe of the track.

The only issue with the album is the final track, “Paid in Full,” which seems out of place and takes away the synergy of the album. It’s not a terrible song, but it feels like it should have been sequenced as one of the earlier tracks of the album.

BOSCO has the ability to surpass her contemporaries in the R&B genre and become the queen with making good music, which feels like it is natural and comes from the heart.

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