The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Series Review-Weird, dark humor crime story set in Kansas City

michael foster-sanders
editor-in-chief

photo courtesy of Disney
Chris Rock plays Loy Cannon, a crime boss who will stop at nothing for success.

When immigrants came to America in search of a better life in the early 1900’s they were persecuted and had to find out their position in the land of equality. 

Combine that with the not long freed slaves after hundreds of years of free labor, no skills, and laws were used to stop them from building a foundation for the betterment of their people.  

The American Dream became the American Nightmare for these in this so-called melting pot, no boiling pot of people trying to carve out their peace of the pie for their culture, and their people.  

Welcome to the world of Fargo. 

In its fourth season, the show decides to take its dark humor crime drama to the past to 1950 Kansas City, MO where Blacks and Italians are trying to find their piece of the American Pie illegally and legally so they can build for their future generations. 

Comedian Chris Rock is not known for his serious roles, but here he’s Loy Cannon. A black no-nonsense crime boss who looks to be legit. Cannon’s crew has an uneasy truce with the Italians mob, who look down upon them because of their skin color.  

Also to add gunpowder on top of this volatile situation it’s a long-standing tradition for the crime families who are in power to swap their son to their other family so they can become versed in the other families’ culture. 

It’s not long before sibling rivalry, and random misfortune from outside forces threatening the uneasy alliance. 

What makes this show work is the stories that are intertwined with the main tale that will have the viewer on the edge of their seat. FX isn’t afraid to spend big on the quality of the production of their show, and here it shows. The viewer will feel like they’re a part of the 1950’s Kansas City town. 

It is also refreshing to see a non stereotypical black criminal which isn’t a stereotype that is prevalent throughout the media. Who carries himself as a businessman, and someone respectable, and not a flat out mindless thug. The dialogue between him and his oldest son is some of the best from prime time TV in a long time. 

Just because this is season four of the series new viewers need not fret, due to each season being a new story from the previous one with new characters. This show might be a contender during Emmy award season. 

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