The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

4-year schools visit NE Campus

By Elyssa Whaley/reporter

Many students start higher education at a community college because of convenience and cost. The journey then often continues to a university, but students have to decide which one.

NE Campus students heard sales pitches from seven universities Nov. 8: Texas Christian University, the University of Texas at Arlington, the University of North Texas, Devry, Texas Tech, Texas Wesleyan and Texas Woman’s University.

UTA representative Rebecca Esposito said 90-plus bachelor degree programs exist at UTA. She emphasized the importance of visiting the potential schools to get a feel for what the university will be like.

“We have a great campus,” said Texas Tech’s Jason Hale. “The classes are set up toward the central part of the campus, and there is a bus system to aid students to navigate around the campus.”

Hale said the school is well on its way to becoming a Tier 1 institution, the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education’s top classification. It also offers scholarships ranging from $4,500 to $6,500 per year and has provided $290 million in financial assistance.

Those hearing the name of Texas Woman’s University might think it is an all-girls school, said TWU representative Stephanie Stephens. However, it is a female and male institution nationally known and ranked for its nursing and occupational therapy programs.

“Our campus is family-friendly [offering family housing] as well as having programs for veterans,” she said.

UNT was described as transfer-friendly and concerned with student affordability as well as a full and fun college experience.

Wesleyan and TCU represented the private sector of higher education.

Joael Kelly, representing TCU, said what sets her school apart “is the value of the education.” She singled out Bob Scheiffer, moderator for the first presidential debate last month and well-known figure in journalism, whose name adorns TCU’s journalism school.

Wesleyan was presented as one of the most affordable private universities with 99 percent of undergraduate students receiving financial aid and small classes averaging 18 students to one instructor.

Vanessa Ximenez of the NE advising and counseling office reminded students interested in transferring to a university to visit a TCC transfer center for informational materials and to talk with advisors from area schools to obtain guidance about the transfer process.

NE will also host University Transfer Day 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Jan. 29 in the NSTU hallway.

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