The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Job loss could equal better satisfaction

03_06_13_unemploymentEDITORIAL

Amid political debates surrounding Obama’s re-election, gun law discussions following the tragedy in Newtown, devastating weather conditions across America and now the sequestration possibilities, one topic is getting pushed further away from the limelight, but it certainly cannot be forgotten — unemployment. 

During the fall of 2009, the unemployment rate across America reached a whopping 10 percent.

The news was splattered on televisions, newsstands, Internet sites and numerous social media outlets. It was discussed across dinner tables in American homes. Many debated solutions in coffee shops along sleepy highway roads.

But where are these conversations now? More importantly, what is the remedy for those who are still unemployed?

Slowly, the unemployment rate has declined since 2009, but only slightly. In January, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported the national unemployment rate is now 7.9 percent, meaning approximately 12.3 million people have yet to find jobs.

Many Americans are desperate for a solution, but the solution may be closer than expected — the solution IS each individual person.

Too often when people lose their jobs, they overlook the fact that they have encountered a new opportunity in their lives.

Yes, unemployment can be an opportunity.

One may choose to finally move to another city, state or country for prospective jobs. Re-evaluating what is important can help people make decisions on what to eliminate, where to cut costs and where to redirect attention. A move could bring a fresh perspective that may have become blurred in the previous environment.

Unemployment may be the big break to change careers, to finally do something that has always been of interest but too intimidating to try. If moving is not an option physically, the change of focus may be the redirection needed to start anew.

Of course, the loss of a job brings new possibilities for further education and training to refine skills in current or new industries as well. Enhancing one’s practice or polishing neglected skills and expertise may deliver additional options that could not be considered previously.

There is no debate that a positive outlook on life-altering changes cannot immediately pay the bills, especially on the undersized income that the government provides through unemployment. But with a bit of effort, focus and determination, the possibilities are endless.

As Friedrich Nietzsche, a German philosopher and poet from the late 19th century once said, “That which does not kill us makes us stronger.”
If unemployment is viewed as an opportunity, rather than a disgrace, the outcome could be far more rewarding down the road.

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