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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Three NE musicians overcome obstacles, challenges to finish school, follow dream

NE student Matthew Huizar rehearses for class performance. Starting at 16 years old, Huizar learned how to play the piano by researching how to read notes and scales. Photo by John Jones/The Collegian
NE student Matthew Huizar rehearses for class performance. Starting at 16 years old, Huizar learned how to play the piano by researching how to read notes and scales. Photo by John Jones/The Collegian
NE student Matthew Huizar rehearses for class performance. Starting at 16 years old, Huizar learned how to play the piano by researching how to read notes and scales. Photo by John Jones/The Collegian
NE student Matthew Huizar rehearses for class performance. Starting at 16 years old, Huizar learned how to play the piano by researching how to read notes and scales. Photo by John Jones/The Collegian

By Daniella Solis/entertainment editor

Three NE music students prove that passion, hard work and dedication, can help one succeed no matter if the individual has a disability or is a late starter in his/her choice of study.

These students are presenting recitals as they complete their studies at TCC.

 

Keitia Jackson

Jackson began playing the saxophone in the 7th grade at Fossil Hill Middle School because of a performance she watched. The low instruments, more specifically, the bass, made her really want to start playing.

Jackson chose to master the saxophone because her parents loved jazz, so she grew up listening to it.

She said she loves the saxophone because it’s a wordless expression.

“It’s hard for me to communicate, and I can communicate with that saxophone,” she said.

She has a hard time communicating because she has autism. Playing in a band also makes her feel a part of something.

Her drive comes from wanting to be great at her instrument so she can teach others.

She plans to attend Texas Woman’s University, majoring in music education and early education.

Her biggest dreams are to help children with disabilities get into a band and, with her mother, open a music therapy business that helps students with disabilities learn music.

James McKinney

McKinney began playing the guitar the summer after his junior year in high school because he wanted to play punk rock music. But the desire to play punk rock music didn’t last long.

After being introduced to jazz by his previous teacher, Jason King, he knew that’s what he wanted to play. He said he loves playing the guitar because he feels a connection with that instrument that is hard to describe.

“I’ve played the piano, but it’s never the same as playing the guitar,” he said.

Last semester, he received the Distinguished Student Scholarship and hopes to win more in the future. He plans to attend the University of Texas in Arlington for its jazz studies program.

His dreams are to have a good band that he can tour with and play somewhere regularly. Making music his livelihood is his ultimate dream. He would also love to record music, play with some famous musicians, as he has already played with Clint Strong, and be someone that people would like to listen to.

 

Matthew Huizar

Huizar was a late starter when it came to the piano. He began at age 16 when he started listening to classical and piano music, which developed his strong desire to learn how to play.

He began researching how to read notes and scales, exercises and different pieces of music until he had learned the basics. He likes the piano because, aside from the sound, he can play a melody and harmonize with himself.

The piano can get a bigger sound, he said. He has been accepted into the University of North Texas’ music program and will major in harpsichord performance.

He is a member of the Sonata Club, which awarded him a $250 scholarship.

His dream is to find a job that is fun, enjoyable and will allow him to apply his musical knowledge to give back in some way with his music.

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