The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Congress needs to avoid sports

By David Boyd/reporter

A few months ago, state legislator Kim Brimer drew criticism from a variety of sources for attempting to grab some publicity by inserting his office and authority into the dispute between cable providers and the NFL network.

Similarly, other politicians have lost their sense of priority and seemingly elevated sports issues more than once in the past month or so, with more than one threat of congressional action to resolve a sports scandal.

Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa, leeched off the Super Bowl hype by choosing that week to announce a pending investigation into the NFL’s possible role in a cover up of any cheating perpetrated by employees of the New England Patriots in the Spygate incidents.

Three years ago, several major league baseball players and executives were called before a congressional committee to testify about steroid usage.

Baseball subsequently commissioned its own investigation, led by former Sen. George Mitchell, which ultimately revealed a long list of players accused of using steroids and human growth hormone.

Some, such as pitcher Andy Pettite, later apologized and admitted to the accuracy of the report. Logically, the next step would be for baseball writers, owners and fans to hold the report’s findings against the implicated cheaters.

Several lawmakers have instead latched onto the idea of holding more hearings and are preparing to charge Roger Clemens with perjury for his previous denials of steroid use during testimony before Congress. 

Evidence contained in the Mitchell Prosecution refuted his denials, and a Clemens trial appears to be a certainty since Pettite and other players have already completed depositions and witnesses on both sides have been asked to testify.

Congress does not involve itself in Hollywood scandals. Why should it get involved in sports? These guys should focus on the countless problems faced by a population struggling with rising fuel prices, a mortgage industry collapse, higher unemployment and a pair of unpopular wars.

Seriously, our country faces probably a hundred problems, both foreign and domestic, that an average citizen could name before we get to one involving sports.

While there are plenty of despicable cretins in the sports world, the exposed sinners should be shunned by their respective leagues, journalists and fans, not called before a Senate subcommittee.

Reports about sports improprieties, including the merits of a potential baseball hall of famer’s steroid use or the cheating performed by a football team’s video crew, belong on ESPN not on C-SPAN or CNN.

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