Fall 2017 final exam schedule

Collegian file photo
Collegian file photo

Final examination periods will be a maximum of one hour and 50 minutes, and examinations will be conducted in the rooms where classes regularly meet. If a class meets at a time other than those listed below, the instructor will announce the examination time. Eight-week courses will have exams during the last class meeting during final exam week.

Dual credit students and students in hybrid sections should verify dates and times with their instructors.

WEEKEND CLASSES: FRIDAY, DEC. 8 All Friday-only classes, regular time and location SATURDAY, DEC. 9 All Saturday-only classes, regular time and location SUNDAY, DEC. 10 All Sunday-only classes, regular time and location.

Students who have conflicting finals on two campuses should talk to the divisional deans on both campuses for alternative testing dates.

TCC Exam Policy: A student who must be absent from a final examination should petition the campus vice president for teaching and learning for permission to postpone the examination. A student absent without permission from a final examination will be graded zero on the examination. Postponed final examinations must be taken within 30 days from the beginning of the next long term. (TCC Catalog 2016-17, pages 48-49) 

 

NE CAMPUS

MONDAY, DEC. 11

8-9:50 a.m. All MWF classes that begin at 8 a.m.

10-11:50 a.m. All MWF classes that begin at 10:10 a.m.

Noon-1:50 p.m. All MWF classes that begin at 12:30 p.m.

2-3:50 p.m. All Monday-only or MW classes that begin at 2 p.m.

6-7:50 p.m. All Monday-only or MW classes that begin at 6 p.m.

8-9:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 9 p.m.

TUESDAY, DEC. 12

8-9:50 a.m. All TTH classes that begin at 8 a.m.

10-11:50 a.m. All TTH classes that begin at 11 a.m.

1-2:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 2 p.m.

3-4:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 3:30 p.m.

6-7:50 p.m. All Tuesday-only classes that begin at 6 p.m. and all TTH classes that begin at 6 p.m. or 6:15 p.m.

8-9:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 7:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 13

9-10:50 a.m. All MWF classes that begin at 9:05 a.m. or 9:30 a.m.

11 a.m.-12:50 p.m. All Friday-only classes that begin at 11 a.m. and MWF classes that begin at 11 a.m. or 11:15 a.m.

2-3:50 p.m. All Wednesday-only classes that begin at 2 p.m.

3-4:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 3:30 p.m.

5-6:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 5 p.m.

6-7:50 p.m. All Wednesday-only classes that begin at 6 p.m.

8-9:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 7:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, DEC. 14

9-10:50 a.m. All TTH classes that begin at 9:30 a.m.

Noon-1:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 12:30 p.m.

5-6:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 5 p.m.

6-7:50 p.m. All Thursday-only classes that begin at 6 p.m.

 

NW CAMPUS

MONDAY, DEC. 11

8-9:50 a.m All MW classes that begin at 8 a.m.

11 a.m.-12:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 11 a.m.

2-3:50 p.m All MW classes that begin at 2 p.m.

6-7:50 p.m All MW classes that begin at 6 p.m.

8-9:50 p.m All MW classes that begin at 7:30 p.m.

TUESDAY, DEC. 12

8-9:50 a.m. All TTH classes that begin at 8 a.m.

11 a.m.-12:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 11 a.m.

2-3:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 2 p.m.

4-5:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 3:30, 4 or 4:30 p.m.

6-7:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 6 p.m.

8-9:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 7:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 13

9:30-11:20 a.m. All MW classes that begin at 9:30 a.m.

12:30-2:20 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 12:30 p.m.

4-5:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 3:30, 4 or 4:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, DEC. 14

9:30-11:20 a.m. …All TTH classes that begin at 9:30 a.m.

12:30-2:20 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 12:30 p.m.

 

SOUTH CAMPUS

MONDAY, DEC. 11

8-9:50 a.m. All Monday-only or Wednesday-only classes that begin at 8 a.m. and all MW classes that begin at 8 or 8:10 a.m.

10-11:50 a.m. All MW classes that begin at 11, 11:15, 11:20 or 11:30 a.m.

2-3:50 p.m. All Monday-only or Wednesday-only classes that begin at 2 p.m. and all MW classes that begin at 2 or 2:05 p.m.

4-5:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 3 or 3:30 p.m.

6-7:50 p.m. All Monday-only or Wednesday-only classes that begin at 5:30,  or 6:30 p.m. and all MW classes that begin at

5, 5:10, 5:20, 5:30, 6 or 6:30 p.m.

8-9:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 9 p.m.

TUESDAY, DEC. 12

8-9:50 a.m. All Tuesday-only or Thursday-only classes that begin at 8 a.m. and all TTH classes that begin at 8 or 8:10 a.m.

10-11:50 a.m. All TTH classes that begin at 11, 11:15 or 11:20 a.m.

2-3:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 3 or 3:30 p.m.

4-5:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 4 or 4:30 p.m.

6-7:50 p.m. All Tuesday-only or Thursday-only classes that begin

at 5:30, 6 or 6:30 p.m. and all TTH classes that begin at 5, 5:10, 5:20, 5:30 or 6 p.m.

8-9:50 p.m. All Tuesday-only or Thursday-only classes that begin at 7 or 7:30 p.m. TTH classes that begin at 7, 7:30, 7:50, 8 or 8:10 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 13

9-10:50 a.m. All MW classes that begin at 9, 9:30 or 10:10 a.m.

Noon-1:50 p.m. All Monday-only or Wednesday-only classes that begin at 12:30 p.m. and all MW classes that begin at 12:30 or 1 p.m.

2-3:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 1:30 p.m.

4-5:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 4 or 4:30 p.m.

7-8:50 p.m. All Monday-only or Wednesday-only classes that begin at 7 or 7:30 p.m. and all MW classes that begin at 7, 7:30, 7:50, 8 or 8:10 p.m.

THURSDAY, DEC. 14

9-10:50 a.m. All TTH classes that begin at 9 or 9:30 a.m.

Noon-1:50 p.m. All Tuesday-only or Thursday-only classes that begin at 12:30 or 1 p.m. and all TTH classes that begin at 12:30, 1 or 1:15 p.m.

2-3:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 1:30, 2 or 2:05 p.m.

 

SE CAMPUS

MONDAY, DEC. 11

8:30-10:20 a.m. All MW, MWF or MTWHF classes that begin at 8:30 a.m.

11-12:50 p.m. All MW or MWF classes that begin at 10 or 10:40 a.m.

2-3:50 p.m. All MW or MTWHF classes that begin at 2:20 or 2:30 p.m.

4-5:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 3:50 or 4 p.m.

7-8:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 7 p.m.

TUESDAY, DEC. 12

7-8:50 a.m. All TTH classes that begin at 7 a.m.

10-11:50 a.m. All TTH classes that begin at 10 a.m.

1-2:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 1 p.m.

4-5:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 4 p.m.

7-8:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 7 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 13

7-8:50 a.m. All MW or MWF classes that begin at 7 a.m.

9-10:50 a.m. All MW or MWF classes that begin at 9:35 a.m.

11 a.m.-12:50 p.m. All MW, MWF or MTWHF classes that begin at 11:30 or 11:45 a.m.

1-2:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 12:50 or 1 p.m.

5:30-7:20 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 5 or 5:30 p.m.

7:30-9:20 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 7:30 or 8:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, DEC. 14

8:30-10:20 a.m. All TTH classes that begin at 8:30 a.m.

11:30 a.m.-1:20 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 11:30 a.m.

2:30-4:20 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 2:30 p.m.

5:30-7:20 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 5 or 5:30 p.m.

7:30-9:20 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 7:30 or 8:30 p.m.

 

TR CAMPUS

MONDAY, DEC. 11 

6:30-8:20 a.m. All MW classes that begin at 6:30 a.m.

9:30-11:20 a.m. All MW classes that begin at 9:30 a.m.

12:30-2:20 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 12:30 p.m.

3:30-5:20 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 3:30 p.m.

7:30-9:20 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 7:30 p.m.

TUESDAY, DEC. 12 

6:30-8:20 a.m. All TTH classes that begin at 6:30 a.m.

9:30-11:20 a.m. All TTH classes that begin at 9:30 a.m.

12:30-2:20 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 12:30 p.m.

3:30-5:20 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 3:30 p.m.

7:30-9:20 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 7:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 13 

8-9:50 a.m. All MW classes that begin at 8 a.m.

11 a.m.-12:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 11 a.m.

2-3:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 2 p.m.

6-7:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 6 p.m.

9-10:50 p.m. All MW classes that begin at 9 p.m.

THURSDAY, DEC. 14 

8-9:50 a.m. All TTH classes that begin at 8 a.m.

11 a.m.-12:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 11 a.m.

2-3:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 2 p.m.

6-7:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 6 p.m.

9-10:50 p.m. All TTH classes that begin at 9 p.m.

Racism, law and mistrust

A police officer watches as protesters march in front of the Ferguson, Missouri, police station in August 2014. Law enforcement’s treatment of minorities has continued to be a nationwide issue ever since.
A police officer watches as protesters march in front of the Ferguson, Missouri, police station in August 2014. Law enforcement’s treatment of minorities has continued to be a nationwide issue ever since. Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS

By Michael Foster-Sanders/campus editor

Policing tactics lead to fear, anxiety among minorities

Gemeral Berry was sitting in the car in front of his house talking with a friend when he was swarmed by law enforcement thinking he was a suspect in a string of robberies around his neighborhood.

“Four police units came from three different directions, and we’re sitting there. A unit parks behind us with the lights on,  and there are two units in front of us,” the NE journalism adjunct instructor said. “The officer asks me for my driver’s license. I asked them why did they stop, and the officer said, ‘There have been burglaries in the area, and we were checking out strange people.’ And I told the officer, ‘If you look at my driver’s license, you will see that I’m in front of my house.’ The only thing the officer said was, ‘Here’s your ID.’”

Even though this happened years ago, Berry is still agitated telling this story. He pointed out a lack of trained empathy on the officer’s part. He felt the officer thought he was above giving an apology for a misunderstanding.

“What I am annoyed at still today is that officer should have at least said, ‘I see you’re here at your house. Sorry for the inconvenience. Have a good night,’” he said. “That officer said nothing. And that’s a problem.”

After a string of racially charged incidents involving law enforcement received national attention, minorities in the TCC community shared their experiences with police. While they said not all police behave badly, their experiences have shaped a mistrust that hasn’t gone away.

NE student Cameron Davis feels like a change needs to be made to how law enforcement interact with minorities after an incident with one suburban officer.

“I felt he only did it because I was black,” Davis said. “Police should give minorities an equal chance when policing instead of policing by stereotypes. I feel that racism is still intact.”

Davis was at a high school football game hanging with friends when he went to get a drink of water. While going down the stairway with friends, he passed a police officer who accused him of bumping into him.

“This white police officer said I bumped into him, but I didn’t,” Davis said. “The officer said did I want to get kicked out the game for bumping into him and threatened me with having to pay higher ticket prices to come to future games.”

Even with Davis’ friends telling the officer that he didn’t bump into him, he was kicked out of the game and given a citation. Davis filed a complaint against the officer and is waiting on a response from the department.

NE student Isaac Sigala said he was a 9-year-old child when his view of law enforcement changed during a traffic stop with his father, sister and a family friend.

“My dad was pulled over, and he had drugs on him, and his white friend tells him to give him the drugs and don’t worry about it,” Sigala said.

Sigala, his father and his 7-year-old sister were searched for over an hour and a half, but the police didn’t search his father’s friend.

“He had the drugs in his boot and was holding a conversation with the officers without being searched,” he said. “That stuck with me.”

Sigala said he’s never had a good interaction with police but still has faith in law enforcement and believes training could help alleviate issues with minority and law enforcement interaction.

Berry echoed the same sentiment about police going through training.

“Are the police being trained properly to interact with the public?” he asked. “One of the things I think happens too many times is those officers are not for diversity. Or if so, they don’t take it seriously.”

Stanford University’s Open Policing Project found evidence linking prejudice to why police require far less reasons to search black and Latino drivers than their white counterparts.

The largest traffic stop study completed looked at more than 60 million police stops in 20 states from 2011 to 2015. It found blacks and Latinos were twice as likely to be searched during a traffic stop than whites. Blacks were 20 percent more likely to receive tickets than whites, and Latinos were 30 percent more likely to receive tickets than whites.

NE radio/television/film instructor Adrian Neely knows about being racially profiled, or “driving while black.” His story is about an encounter late night on an Elgin, Texas, highway.

“I was pulled for doing 51 in a 50,” he said. “The officer asked me could he search the car. Was I supposed to tell him no? It’s dark, and it’s pretty late. It was cold outside while I was waiting for him to get through searching the vehicle. He let me go after, but 51 in a 50 and searching my vehicle was enough for me.”

Sigala explained the unwritten rules that minorities have to know when going through small towns with a high chance of being racially profiled.

“When you’re driving through Hurst and you’re a minority, you know not to be ‘riding dirty’ and have everything in order because Hurst is not the place to be messing around,” Sigala said.

Campus ranks high for veterans assistance

TR student Veterans Association president Donny Gore signs in to the Vet Success Center.
TR student Veterans Association president Donny Gore signs in to the Vet Success Center. Photo by Gabrielle Saleh/The Collegian

By Kathryn Kelman/editor-in-chief

TR Campus was recognized by Military Times as one of the best places for veterans to pursue a college education.

The publication ranked the campus as the nation’s No. 2 public two-year higher education institution.

“Tarrant County College Trinity [River] is proud to be recognized as one of the top two-year education institutions,” TR president Sean Madison said. “As a veteran-friendly campus, we serve hundreds of veterans each semester, offering quality support and services to help them succeed academically and professionally.”

The ranking is based on Military Times’ annual comprehensive school assessment of veteran and military student services and academic achievement rates.

This fall, TCC’s six-campus district had 2,500 veterans accessing education benefits, with 304 of them attending TR, according to a TCC press release.

TCC’s ranking represents an impressive distinction for the college, according to Military Times. 

The publication’s annual survey asks colleges and universities to document an array of services, special rules, accommodations and financial incentives offered to students with military ties and to describe many aspects of veteran culture on campus. Military Times also factors in data from the Veterans Affairs and Defense departments.

TR’s Vet Success Center is open to all veteran students and provides a variety of different services intended to help them succeed academically.
TR’s Vet Success Center is open to all veteran students and provides a variety of different services intended to help them succeed academically.
Photo by Gabrielle Saleh/The Collegian

Of the hundreds of schools that applied, fewer than half received the Military Times Best: Colleges designation this year,” said George Altman, the Military Times editor in charge of the rankings. “For the past eight years, we’ve seen colleges and universities consistently increasing their resources, revising their policies and improving their academic outcomes for military and veteran students. The Military Times’ Best: Colleges rankings showcase the very best of these efforts.”

TR veterans counselor Kevin Curry, who helps run TR’s Vet Success Center, said the recognition was due to the campus offering individualized services to veterans as well as the campus’ service-oriented environment and veteran engagement activities and programming.

“Vet Success Center staff and the veteran campus champions at TR attempt with every interaction every day to make every veteran feel noticed and revered,” Curry said. “Veterans are asked routinely if they need anything, and staff are proactive to see their needs when they are reluctant to admit it. We call this ‘vigilant compassion’ in the Vet Success Center.”

The center provides a one-stop place for services veterans need, he said. It offers comprehensive explanations and VA benefits enrollment. The staff also completes a staff and peer orientation to acclimate veterans to the college and to TR’s services.

“Our center provided a survey and testing to discern what each need each veteran has,” Curry said. “The Vet Success Center and Student Veteran Association additionally provides a varied menu of service projects and advocacy activities to afford students to feel a sense of mission accomplishment.”

Most importantly, Curry said, the center provides a homey, comfortable lounge where veterans can feel part of a supportive community of peers.

TCC supports veterans and the military, which makes it a good place for veterans to pursue a degree, Curry said.

“This honor is confirmation to the administration, faculty, staff and campus veteran champions that their tireless work to create a special environment for veterans was noticed,” he said. “This award truly is a campus award as the Military Times highlighted the uniquely positive, supportive environment the campus provided for veterans.”

Muslim counteracts stereotypes

SE student Nashat Qashou is currently the president of the Muslim Student Association. The club aims to give students a healthy, social and faithful atmosphere.
SE student Nashat Qashou is currently the president of the Muslim Student Association. The club aims to give students a healthy, social and faithful atmosphere. Photo by Peter Matthews/The Collegian

By Raegan Scharfetter/managing editor

Even though SE student Nashat Qashou is proud to be born in Arlington, he has still experienced the sting of discrimination.

Sent to Jordan by his father in third grade along with his mother and brothers, Qashou learned Arabic and more about his culture during his time living there.

“My brothers and I met both sides of the family, went to school, made some friends and learned a lot very fast,” he said. “But coming back to school in America definitely was a different environment.”

From what they believe in to the clothes they wear, Muslims are treated differently in America. Qashou aims to spread his message of what being Muslim is really like and how it is misconstrued in American society.

The kindness of Qashou’s fifth-grade teacher, Ms. Crumbaker, helped him pick up English and get back on his feet, he said.

However, his return to America was not easy. Qashou faced ridicule for being Muslim starting when he first returned home when people labeled him a newcomer, fresh off the boat.

“A few of the biggest hardships have been comments from closed-minded people saying to go back to where you came from and go back to your country,” he said. “We are treated differently, and this is only in America.”

While in junior high near the anniversary of Sept. 11, his class was shown a clip of the towers being hit and classmates looked toward him.

“They were showing the clip, and my friends made fun of me,” he said. “I stayed strong and ignored it, but it taught me to choose my friends wisely and to be the bigger man in every situation.”

Nashat Qashou learned to choose his friends wisely and be the bigger person early in life.
Nashat Qashou learned to choose his friends wisely and be the bigger person early in life.
Photo by Peter Matthews/The Collegian

These experiences have affected Qashou in a negative way. The lack of knowledge and rudeness from others for just following a religion and expressing thoughts and culture was disappointing, he said

Although he has faced many trials and tribulations, Qashou said the only thing he currently gets from others is an occasionally foul facial expression when he wears his kufi (a hat that is worn with a robe called a thobe for prayer).

“Of course, there is discrimination, but generally, people are very respectful, and they try to separate terrorists from Muslim people,” he said. “Otherwise, I have a safe and beautiful life. And from what I’ve seen, SE Campus has been more than welcoming. We are a family.”

As for the root of the problems Muslims have faced in the past and present, Qashou blames the media, closed-minded individuals and ignorance.

“People are brainwashed to believe everything they see and read, whether it’s on CNN or any news channel,” he said. “This includes real-life situations and aspects that we all go through.”

Qashou would like people to know that Muslims are just like other humans. The only difference between Muslims and others are that most Muslims follow the religion strongly from how beautiful the message is, he said.

Qashou is currently the president of the Muslim Student Association, a SE club that aims to provide students with a healthy, social and faithful atmosphere to develop a good understanding of Islam according to the Quran or the prophet’s teachings.

“We have discussions that dispel any misconceptions about Islam and develop strong relationships amongst Muslims and non-Muslim students on this campus,” he said. “My experience with MSA has welcomed a fellow brother to Islam, Sekou, with God’s guidance and help from myself, imams [priests], scholars and his own studies over the religion. He has accepted this religion to be true, and his decision has become my motivation and inspiration to help and inspire others to the beautiful message of God.”

Qashou, a business marketing major, hopes to obtain his master’s degree in business and eventually become a full-time imam. He also aims to be a humanitarian for his community, a math instructor, and he is looking into joining the Air Force.

“These are careers and dreams that I will strive to accomplish and will make them all come into action,” he said. “Like the Prophet Mohammed said it himself, ‘Actions with the good intention will get the biggest rewards.’”

Editorial – ‘Complicit’ perfectly sums up this year

Illustration by Aftin Gavin/The Collegian
Illustration by Aftin Gavin/The Collegian

Dictionary.com recently announced its 2017 Word of the Year, and it couldn’t be more fitting.

Complicit was the chosen word. And complicity occurred in multiple aspects of society this year from politics to pop culture.

The word is defined as “choosing to be involved in an illegal or questionable act, especially with others; having partnership or involvement in wrongdoing.”

Complicit saw its initial spike in searches on March 12, the day after Saturday Night Live aired a satirical ad featuring Scarlett Johansson as Ivanka Trump selling a perfume named Complicit. The ad marketed the scent as “The fragrance for the woman who could stop all this but won’t.”

The Word of the Year saw its largest spike in searches April 5, in response to something else involving Ivanka Trump, except it was the real Ivanka this time who attempted to redefine the word in an interview with Gayle King.

In the interview, Ivanka was asked about the accusations that she and her husband, Jared Kushner, are complicit with the actions of her father, to which she responded, “If being complicit is wanting to be a force for good and to make a positive impact, then I’m complicit.”

But being complicit isn’t good or positive. In fact, being complicit is undoubtedly negative as it means that a person is involved with someone or something that is wrong.

For the website, the Word of the Year is a symbol of the most meaningful events and looked-up trends throughout the year. So the word complicit was the perfect choice for 2017, but not because of the increase in searches or because people were complicit.

It’s perfect because people stopped being complicit in 2017 and spent the year fighting injustice and inequality. It seems particularly fitting with all of the sexual assault victims coming forward and the number of protests seen around the world demanding change.

According to the website, the word was partially chosen because of people who refused complicity in the face of oppression and corruption this year. From the hours people spent calling legislators to block bills to NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s 2016 protest against systemic racial injustices gaining more traction, from the downfall of powerful sexual predators to the high-profile resignations from the Trump administration.

Perhaps the most memorable was Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake, who when announcing his retirement said, “I have children and grandchildren to answer to. And so, Mr. President, I will not be complicit,” and urged fellow Republicans to speak out because “silence can equal complicity.”

Another reason the word fits is because, as these events unfolded, people were forced to examine their own behavior and ask themselves if they, too, had been complicit because of their inaction and silence.

However, silence doesn’t always equal complicity. Society must keep in mind that those who have been negatively affected by assault, violence or social injustices are not obligated to share their stories with anyone, ever.

As 2017 draws to a close, may Dictionary.com’s Word of the Year continue to remain relevant in 2018 by reminding everyone that inaction is an action and that silent acceptance of wrongdoing is how the world got this way.

Moving forward, may people continue to stand up and speak out against injustice of all kinds.

And may we keep in mind that if we let injustice continue to become the norm, then we will all be complicit.

Viewpoint – People need to learn dangers of harassment

The Collegian Logo
The Collegian Logo

By Annette Kirk/campus editor

Harassment has become a heated topic the past month as women have come forward about inappropriate sexual behavior conducted by men.

Too often, these stories come after the action has happened and damages have occurred. Inappropriate behavior can rise at any time and come from a close friend, a family member or an acquaintance.

When harassment starts, it can be with a few words that we women may play off or hope won’t continue. It can occur over a series of emails left unresponded. It can occur in repetitive phone calls with the same voice but different names.

Women are not responsible for making sure harassment does not occur. Inappropriate indiscretions should never be their fault, and the perpetrator is the only one to blame. However, everyone has a responsibility to know when enough is enough and how to recognize unwanted behavior before it gets out of hand.

The National Crime Victimization Survey shows one in every six women are victims of attempted or completed rape. That’s 53.8 million perpetrators who need to be educated. They need to know that their behavior is wrong and know that enough is enough.

At any point, if you feel uncomfortable or that what you are doing will make the person receiving your attention uncomfortable, then rethink the manner in which the situation is handled.

With the increase in the social media movement, social media platforms have become a hub for unwanted attention to begin. People have the right to speak freely and post as they feel, but within reason. If the person receiving the comments feels uncomfortable, that is when enough is enough.

Not reporting the unwanted attention can lead to serious consequences for both individuals. Cyberstalking and harassment can lead to stalking in person and progress into unwanted territory like physical contact and even forced sex.

Whether the attention is being given or received, it is important to accept that not all attention is wanted.  Counselors and friends can provide advice and recommendations to approach these situations.

In Texas, no legal action can be taken unless there is an imminent threat. This leaves harassment cases open without support for the victims and allows the harassment to progress.

It is up to all of us to be educated, supportive and leave the next generation with a healthier and safer environment.

Viewpoint – Alternative facts are hazardous to society

The Collegian Logo
The Collegian Logo

By Michael Foster-Sanders/campus editor

This newfound phenomenon where people try to skew the truth into their own version to fit a narrative called alternative facts is stupid and dangerous, especially in this day and age where people take everything at face value.

At the end of the day, alternative facts are still just lies.

A Texas textbook was criticized in 2015 for teaching that Africans who came during the trans-Atlantic slave trade were “workers,” not people who were bought and sold like property.

That’s a perfect example of how something that’s a lie goes unchecked and becomes dangerous.

Lying has been around since the beginning of time, but “alternative facts” is a recent phrase coined by Kellyanne Conway during a Meet the Press interview where she defended White House secretary Sean Spicer’s false statements about President Trump’s attendance numbers at his inauguration.

Conway said, “Spicer didn’t lie. He gave alternative facts.” She was then ridiculed in the media and became a laughing stock on social media for lying.

When Colin Kaepernick started to take a knee to combat injustice against minorities, Trump used alternative facts to explain why Kaepernick was taking a knee to spin the narrative in his direction and turn people against Kaepernick.

Trump claimed Kaepernick was disrespecting the flag and American veterans.

Even with a veteran coming out to defend Kaepernick and talking about the issue and suggesting he kneel so there would not be any confusion about his protest, the lie was big enough to be seen as the truth in people’s eyes.

How does a person combat alternative facts? The truth must be presented and backed up by proven facts. It must be stressed to the people telling the lie that they’re wrong.

As former senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan said, “Everybody is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.”

New greenhouse approved by board

Standing on the foundation of the greenhouse that was destroyed by a 2016 fire, NW horticulture program coordinator David Bulpitt explains what will change with the new structure.
Standing on the foundation of the greenhouse that was destroyed by a 2016 fire, NW horticulture program coordinator David Bulpitt explains what will change with the new structure. Photo by Peter Matthews/The Collegian

By Dylan Bradley/campus editor

$300,000 structure will ensure horticulture program can keep up with growth

The construction of a new greenhouse on NW Campus was approved by the board of trustees during the Nov. 14 meeting.

The contract approved with Chambers Engineering to construct the greenhouse cost just under $300,000, according to a board memo. The new building is replacing a greenhouse that was destroyed by a fire in 2016, according to the memo.

Students in the NW horticulture program are using existing greenhouses to grow a number of flowers.
Students in the NW horticulture program are using existing greenhouses to grow a number of flowers.
Photo by Peter Matthews/The Collegian

The greenhouse will be much larger than the old one and will help the horticulture program keep up with growing enrollment, program coordinator David Bulpitt said.

“We had more graduates last year than any time in the last seven years,” he said. “Hopefully, we can keep the momentum.”

NW student Arden Maynard is in her first year with the horticulture program.

“I’m really excited to see the advances in the new one,” she said.

The greenhouse could have environmental control technology that will allow him to monitor and change the greenhouse conditions from his smartphone, Bulpitt said.

Architects show their design of the new NW Campus greenhouse approved by the board during the Nov. 14 meeting.
Architects show their design of the new NW Campus greenhouse approved by the board during the Nov. 14 meeting.
Courtesy TCC

The new greenhouse will be made of glass, Bulpitt said, which should be pleasing to the eye.

NW student Judy Hill said while the new greenhouse is going to enhance the entire campus, a polyfiber construction material is better suited to keep up with industry standards and the North Texas environment.

“Glass would be OK if [the greenhouses] weren’t in Texas because they hold so much heat,” Hill said. “We have hailstorms, and it could get damaged.”

Storm curtains will be installed on the new structure to counteract the increased heat absorption glass has over a polyfiber material and protect from hail damage, Bulpitt said.

It’s estimated construction will take six to seven months, depending on the academic calendar, according to the memo to the board.